5 Comments

  • Michael Stein

    Everyone trying to tear down American statues because they say "it represents slavery" or "he was a mass murderer". are either muslim apologists or muslims. Try and find one person demanding these statues be removed who isnt'. Try. And the real punchline to all this is Mohammed was a slave merchant and it was the muslims who captured, enslaved, and sold Africans around the world. So why in the hell are we propping up mohammed and letting his pedophile worshipping cult members and their apologists tear down American Statues?!! You either learn how to educate yourselves and fight or you'll go down.

  • Michael Stein

    I repeat. Everyone trying to tear down American statues because they say "it represents slavery" or "he was a mass murderer". are either muslim apologists or muslims. Try and find one person demanding these statues be removed who isnt'. Try. And the real punchline to all this is Mohammed was a slave merchant and it was the muslims who captured, enslaved, and sold Africans around the world. So why in the hell are we propping up mohammed and letting his pedophile worshipping cult members and their apologists tear down American Statues?!! You either learn how to educate yourselves and fight or you'll go down.

  • Southern Gentleman

    “We Are Fighting for Independence, Not Slavery”. – Jefferson Davis President of the Confederacy to Edward Kirk

    “I have always been in favor of Emancipation.” – Robert E Lee

    “Let us stand together. We may differ in color, but not in sentiment. Many things have been said about me which are wrong, and which white and black persons here, who stood by me through the war, can contradict.” – Nathan Bedford Forrest

    “African Americans have the right to vote.” – Confederate Colonel John Salmon Ford

    The confederate soldier “Fought because he was provoked, intimidated, and ultimately invaded”
    -James Webb Born Fighting a History of the Scoth-Irish in America

    “I was fighting for my home, and he had no business being there”
    -Virginia confederate Solider Frank Potts

    List of causes of the Civil War-

    Harpers Ferry

    On the night of October 16, 1859, Brown and a band of followers seized the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), in what is believed to have been an attempt to arm a slave insurrection. (Brown denied this at his trial, but evidence indicated otherwise.) They were dislodged by a force of U.S. Marines led by Army lieutenant colonel Robert E. Lee.

    Brown was swiftly tried for treason against Virginia and hanged. Southern reaction initially was that his acts were those of a mad fanatic, of little consequence. But when Northern abolitionists made a martyr of him, Southerners came to believe this was proof the North intended to wage a war of extermination against white Southerners. Brown’s raid thus became a step on the road to war between the sections.

    States' Rights

    The idea of states' rights was not new to the Civil War. Since the Constitution was first written there had been arguments about how much power the states should have versus how much power the federal government should have. The southern states felt that the federal government was taking away their rights and powers.

    Political power

    That was not enough to calm the fears of delegates to an 1860 secession convention in South Carolina. To the surprise of other Southern states—and even to many South Carolinians—the convention voted to dissolve the state’s contract with the United States and strike off on its own.

    South Carolina had threatened this before in the 1830s during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, over a tariff that benefited Northern manufacturers but increased the cost of goods in the South. Jackson had vowed to send an army to force the state to stay in the Union, and Congress authorized him to raise such an army (all Southern senators walked out in protest before the vote was taken), but a compromise prevented the confrontation from occurring.

    Perhaps learning from that experience the danger of going it alone, in 1860 and early 1861 South Carolina sent emissaries to other slave holding states urging their legislatures to follow its lead, nullify their contract with the United States and form a new Southern Confederacy. Six more states heeded the siren call: Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. Others voted down secession—temporarily. When President Lincoln called for Volunteers to invade the south, six southern states voted to join the Confederacy.

    The issue of slavery

    The burning issue that led to the disruption of the union was the debate over the future of slavery. Secession brought about a war in which the Northern and Western states and territories fought to preserve the Union, and the South fought to establish Southern independence as a new confederation of states under its own constitution.

    Most of the states of the North, meanwhile, one by one had gradually abolished slavery. A steady flow of immigrants, especially from Ireland and Germany during the potato famine of the 1840s and 1850s, insured the North a ready pool of laborers, many of whom could be hired at low wages, diminishing the need to cling to the institution of slavery. Child labor was also a growing trend in the North.

    The agrarian South utilized slaves to tend its large plantations and perform other duties. On the eve of the Civil War, some 4 million Africans and their descendants toiled as slave laborers in the South. Slavery was interwoven into the Southern economy although only a relatively small portion of the population actually owned slaves.

    – History . net

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