Consumers’ Right to Know (Country of Origin of Food) Bill – First Reading – Video 2
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Consumers’ Right to Know (Country of Origin of Food) Bill – First Reading – Video 2


a question is of the motion be agreed to ice cream mckelvey Thank You mr. speaker well as a number of fists going to occur in the pattern of this afternoon I’m first of all I want to congratulate the member steph and browning on having the luck to draw a bill out of the bell but there’s three other fish involved in this that’s the best speech I’ve ever heard the member makin that house I’m the second one is the I didn’t ever think I would leave here agreeing was safe and browning and he’s going to leave here before me with a bit of luck and fed up not sure about that either the MiGs first is that he got through a speech without mentioning roundup and I think it’s pretty amazing I want to congratulate him on that as well there is another one which I’ll get on to you shortly but but Mr Speaker I think it was very interesting that the member has drawn a bill which I think sentimentally I’m many people in New Zealand agree with them and he’s outlined dead in the course of his um his speech a month or two ago and the National Party are going to support the stew fish reading and there’s a number of reasons for us supporting this the first reading and I will get on to some of the challenges we’ve got there with that in a little while but first of all I want to talk about a little bit of the background of this so so the primary production select committee I I guess is a pretty collegial sort of select committee we talk about a lot of issues outside of business hours I suppose for one of a bit of weird although the poor Clark has to listen to us quite often and and this is an issue that we often talk about because one or two of the members of this Parliament managed to raise it with respect to almost everything we discuss in that select committee and that in the previous member is one of those and and so it is an issue that I think’s of interest to New Zealand’s as New Zealanders and so of interest to a large number of our commercial grower entities and and I think it’s something that we will get to as we move through the implementation or the silica many discussions on this bill I was rather intrigued with the title the consumer is right to know country origin food belt and one could compile quite a committee stage speech on that title I would imagine and no doubt someone will that it is an interesting name and I’m sure that may well get simplified in the course of the process but it does as some as mr. browning pointed out sits out the requirements to label the country of origin of single component foods and the interestingly about single component foods as they can have additives in them but their additive that are basically concerned with preserving the foods in enabling I guess those foods to be sold in a safe manner and those the types of things I’m talking about a salt water sugar and and a number of other things like that but of course the the magnet a single component food really plays right into the primary production productive sector in New Zealand and meat fresh fruit vegetables grains nuts Flair oils etc all things that we grow very well in New Zealand many of those items are also imported into New Zealand and and the two dominant supermarket chains in New Zealand currently have their own versions I guess of country of origin labeling in place and and many other organizations around New Zealand do use a country of origin designation and the course of what they do so so there’s an issue that I think’s of great interest to us it’s an interest an issue that already is used by a large number of entities and a large number of countries around the world in New Zealand of course we have many of the meat company’s branding their meat with the New Zealand brand we have the dairy industry doing the same thing the wine industry very strongly orientated to New Zealand and no doubt time stuart-smith we’ll talk about that when he gets an opportunity to speak on this bill in a few minutes time I guess the most famous one worldwide of scotch whisky and you can buy scotch whisky made in other parts of the world but it’s always Scotch whisky wherever it’s made it provided they can get a license to make it and and that’s the sort of thing that that country of origin laid has been used for and that this issue is often confused with a food safety issue and and I’m sure when Jo Goodhew gets up to speak shortly she’ll have a view on that because it most certainly isn’t a food safety issue it’s an issue I think of interest for people and it gives people comfort knowing where your food comes from and I suppose the most startling experience that I’ve had of that is when you go to a supermarket and in a place like Singapore or even Taiwan for their mirror and you see the country of origin almost as priced by country of origin and whilst I don’t think for a minute that’s a trade barrier but certainly is an advantage to some countries to have the country’s brand very firmly on the food so country of origin labeling will have an impact on price there’s no doubt about that it will have an impact on what people choose to pick off the supermarket shelf or or the other or the shelf of whatever place they choose to buy their food but it’s pretty common around the world and it certainly is a very influential many parts of the world and so so the next issue I want to get on to is trade and I’ve touched on that a moment ago I don’t think that there’s any way you could conceive that that country of origin labeling as any for as any form of trade barrier and i think that the Select Committee no doubt will have a significant discussion on that issue and I’m sure there will be submissions on that issue to the Select Committee on this bill but I don’t think it could be conceived as that and its practice than 70 parts the world that I think it’s logical that it will and it will just form a forms part of the natural process of food production the sale of food I want to talk for a minute about cost and that this is the interesting thing about member’s bills when they’re drawn of course that the government hasn’t done a lot of research on or the government departments haven’t done a lot of research on on the cost or the ramifications of those of the potential implementation of the conditions of these bills and so there’s a lot of work to be done on us and the Select Committee will obviously ask for some of this information as well but there is quite a few things that you could look at and think there might be costs involved and the other issue I think that’s really important is how you designate what qualifies to be label and not what doesn’t and so how do you label a cabbage for example it’s sitting in your Road gate if you’ve got to package it straight away it’s setting to the cost of that cabbage and i know that’s a little frivolous issue but nonetheless we’ve struck that with a lot of the legislation in the food sector in new zealand and so we end up putting cost on a little producer and the little the little retail business that that we otherwise might not have there will be some work for the selectmen’s gets through the through the process to the other area is the one of enforcement or never to believe there’s a significant cost of enforcement anything we do in New Zealand and and there will be some cost of enforcement in this case too because why dad suppose you really need to go to a country of origin labeling process if everyone was asked but not everyone’s honest and so definitely there will be some enforcement issues and I think the other challenge for the for the industry will be how the labeling works and whether it needs to be consistent and I’m sure will and those are those are sort of things that are pretty interesting and challenging for both the government who has to implement this this legislation that gets through to the third reading and certainly will be for the Select Committee as we move along the speaker what I’ve seen a moment talking about an area that provides much of the food for New Zealand and and just have some empathy for the Bay of Plenty and edge can particularly I think that that area provides a lot of food and for New Zealand and and currently has had some significant flooding issues and I course come from an area the men or two where which frequently floods as well of course our best food producing areas of museums are all low flood plains and cello in fact right around the world wherever you look in the world actually the best food producing areas are low and generally river and floodplains always vulnerable in at-risk sabres figure that there does a pretty brief summation of where I think we’re at with this film I do want to congratulate like the member on drawing a bill he has a bit of lack from time to time I was going to say my glasses full around up but it’s not it’s only half full but congratulations dip and I think you’ve done pretty well with it savers speaker and the National Party will be supporting this bill to first reading and and I look forward to the discussions that we have in that select committee when the time comes thank you speak cool what we know check out to make way to not be mr. speaker and I’m

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