Minors (Court Consent to Relationships) Legislation Bill – Third Reading – Video 2
Articles,  Blog

Minors (Court Consent to Relationships) Legislation Bill – Third Reading – Video 2


[Applause] the question is that the motion be agreed to tomorrow night or to Fadi I call Lewis Alou Tanaka among IOT study it is my absolute pleasure to speak on the third reading of the miners caught consent to relationships legislation bill that seeks to ensure those who are 16 in 17 years of age and Altair Dora New Zealand who want to marry who want to be engaged in a civil union or an effective formalized defecto relationship will do so not through the consent of the appearance but through the consent of the court in doing this I’d like to acknowledge my colleague Joe Hayes who I also coach here the cross-party Commonwealth women parliamentarians and say I’m incredibly proud of you Joe your advocacy you’re being a champion for ending forced marriages and New Zealand and I want to reiterate that this is a give cater voice moment this is the hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of women’s suffrage and New Zealand and actually we finally realized the power that women have across this house if we work together I also must acknowledge dr. Jackie blue who actually started this process through her advocacy and work with organizations such as Shakti when she was the National Party lust MP based and mount Roscoe and it does really speak to I guess the relationships that we develop with our communities understanding some of our community needs and aspirations and then working with them constructively and pulling and partners to make sure that we find solutions to real problems and I’d also like to congratulate that New Zealand National Party for allowing one of your colleagues to put a bill into the ballot that actually has had a few members names to it starting with dr. Jackie blue ending work Joe Hayes that means we’ll have a piece of legislation that’s a foot for our purpose and is going to ensure that forced marriages do not happen in New Zealand I’m going to take us through a bit of a history lesson because I think it’s really important so we did this whole 16 17 year-olds be allowed to marry with the consent of the appearance actually come from it actually came from the marriage act of 1955 but actually if we go back even further there was since 1933 that if you were age 16 and 17 actually under 21 that you could get married with the consent of your appearance so we’d see the minimum age was 16 what was it before that it was actually 12 so in New Zealand you could get married if you were 12 if you were a girl and 14 if you were a boy and that was based on the English marriage ex that we inherited when we were colonized so the first marriage validation act was 1842 so this whole issue about being able to marry from the age of 16 came from 1933 pieces of legislation so forced marriages in New Zealand what is the context what was the evidence between 2000 and 2006 actually shakthi started reporting issues of false marriage annulled or New Zealand now I’ve been able to find some data so between 2011 and 2016 Shakti had worked with over 300 young people suspected of forced marriage so these were victims Gill’s aged between 14 and 16 who became engaged in the shocking part of this is there actually there were girls as young as 10 and New Zealand who’d been engaged to an older male in 2007 Shakti and New Zealand NGOs presented their concerns to Sidor regarding forced marriage and the specific impact on migrant and Refugee communities sedol made a recommendation that Zeeland should actually address this issue in 2009 a petition was lead by Jayne Pritchard from Pacific woman’s watch regarding forced marriage and was presented to the house of parliament in 2010 the select committee outcome report to Parliament acknowledged that forced in Android marriage was an issue in all Teodoro New Zealand and urged the government to address this issue unfortunately the government failed to address that issue in 2010 so what happened well what happened was so actually also the concluding observations from seed or committee and in June 2012 provided strong recommendations to the New Zealand government to do something about forced marriage then inspired dr. Jackie blue to write a bill and she wrote that bill as the inaugural co-chair of a cross-party woman’s group outcome a mouth woman parliamentarians and I also want to acknowledge our colleague the Honorable Carmel super Looney who was also the first inaugural co-chair and so they wrote this bill Jackie did got it through a caucus and got it into the ballot in February 2015 our Commonwealth women parliamentarians became a champion of the scope upper how did we do that we actually became the first purple country in the world to end forced marriage it’s part of the in child brides Coe Papa and how did we achieve it because over 80% of this parliament voted to enforce marriage and to end child brides and i do have to acknowledge that at that time I believe we could have got a hundred percent but some of the ministers were unable to sign that petition and so I am incredibly proud that we were able as woman and all of our political parties to talk to our men and our parties to support the scope upper in overwhelmingly they did so I think our male colleagues for actually understanding how important this issue was instead with us given we were collectively saying we need your help to address this particular issue now this whole issue in terms of an international context mr. speaker became it was elucidated on the 11th of October 2012 which was the first International Day of the girl child in that first International Day of the girl child highlighted this issue of forced marriage child brides there are 1 point 1 billion girls worldwide who are married some of them are third of them before the age of 15 you know this is a big issue girls as young as 5 years of age are given away to men they lose their childhoods they have unwanted in life-threatening pregnancies they lose the opportunity of an education they lose life opportunities they suffer psychological abuse they suffer physical abuse and they’re expected to provide sex to their husbands from that young age so what happens they have ruptured vagina walls there are internal ruptures which result in permanent and continence initially for some of those girls they died on the night they consummate the marriage this is how strikingly repugnant this practices globally and for us as a parliament to prioritize this issue and to actually work together as women and men as colleagues as something that we should be incredibly proud of I think the Toki that Joe Hayes created at the end of he recorded or was incredibly poignant because what it speaks to is the power of us to work together this place is incredibly adversarial there’s a lot of conflict but there are actually measures where we can put politics aside and actually work as a parliament for the betterment of specific groups in our society who are facing you know terrible horrible circumstances and so I just want to say that as a member of our Commonwealth women parliamentarians it’s one of the most satisfying roles co-chairing that group that I could ever imagine because we’re changing the world you know we’re helping protect a vulnerable group of people and we’re also making a statement as a country that we will do everything we can to contribute to the global eradication of ending child rights and actually fulfilling the potential of the sustainable development goals and for people who don’t think it’s that relevance for noteid or New Zealand it is and what we’re trying to do is create a global consciousness around these types of issues so again can I just finally say carpe Joe Hayes you will go down in history and it’s particularly poignant with our colleague Jane Logie in the house at the moment because some of the bills that have been passed this year call it serendipity or whatever but the spirit of Kate Shepherd is worth all of us nor data tena koe toka talk point of order the Honorable Tracy Martin mr. speaker I see believed to make a personal personal explanation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *