Resource Legislation Amendment Bill – Committee Stage (23) – Part 1
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Resource Legislation Amendment Bill – Committee Stage (23) – Part 1


or any other region that thinks GE is important to them I’m I’m gonna call Julie and ginger You mr. chair very pleased to be able to take a call in this debate it’ll be my first call in this debate because I’ve spent the day being the emcee for the young planners Congress which is taking place in willington and of course with my planning background this is an issue that’s very very dear to my heart the minister might recall two years ago at the nzd I congra conference i asked him then if he would consider a royal commission of inquiry or some sort of broad-based inquiry into the RMA as had been called for by the acts one of the ex original authors Sir Geoffrey Palmer and at that time the minister said oh no we wouldn’t want to do that of course the opposition would be very happy with the commission of inquiry because it would slow down the process but i think that the minister is far too cynical and what he hasn’t realized is that two years later now that this bill which is really a bit of a shambles is coming to the house it hasn’t really addressed the fundamental underlying issues with the RMA which i’m sure all New Zealanders would agree need to be addressed and some of those were drawn out by the Productivity Commission recently in its report that our urban planning so I would put it to the minister that if he and the National Party really wanted to fundamentally fix the issues with the RMA it would have been better to get broad-based support from all parties in the house and to do it through an independent process like an independent inquiry so we could actually get to the bottom of the issues and not just gloss over them and treat them in a narrow ideological sense because this bill just like the many other bills that his government has has brought to the house since they’ve been in government I’m trying to tinker with the RMA are actually making the act more and more difficult and less likely to deliver on the objectives that we actually want and what New Zealanders actually want I’m sure everyone would agree is to protect the the environment they care about the environment and to ensure that we have sound urban planning in place so that we have complete communities and while it is vitally important to address the housing crisis we can’t do it simply by removing all regulation and allowing developers to subdivide and build a bunch of houses out in the middle of nowhere because houses in the middle of nowhere of not of any use to people people don’t just want an affordable house they need a house that gives them access to jobs that gives them access to amenities where they have close proximity to parks where there’s decent stormwater infrastructure so there’s not going to be problems with flooding in the future because we know that they’re going to be increased increased floods as a result of climate change in some places so Minister I think it’s unfortunate that you didn’t take that opportunity that you’ve had being in government now nearly nine years to have that broader base to inquiry into the RMA and although the minister’s regularly accused the Greens of opposing changes to planning rules that would enable more development in affordable places I think he can quite soon clearly see a constructive contribution from the greens which I’ve brought to him on many occasions and in this particular debate it’s in supplementary order paper to a eight which proposes to amend sop no number 2 74 which was in the name of david seymour so one of the most costly planning rules that has resulted in unaffordable housing in a few inefficient use of land and terrible congestion in our towns and cities are the rules that require huge numbers of car parks for every new development and of course there’s far more efficient ways of managing car parking in a way that means that people can actually access the parks when they need to get somewhere but more importantly that the land the valuable land in our towns and cities is used in ways that are actually good for people whether that is homes or businesses or schools or shops or parks the things that really make our communities worth living in is not tied to storage for Motor Vehicles and if we can use less of that land because at the at this point in time there’s about three empty car parks for everyone that’s being used in New Zealand so that’s a massive oversupply of car parking and most of that land is valuable urban land that could be used for more productive uses simply by I’m adopting the SOP that I’ve proposed it would mean that councils could use far more far more effective management based approaches to managing demand for parking rather than over supplying the land for parking and that’s just one step that would ensure that our mr. chair mm-monster chair Julian genta Thank You mr. chair that is just one simple step that his government could adopt working proactively with councils to use far better management practices for managing parking that would free up heaps of valuable urban land now that’s only one small step because there’s a whole lot of other things his government needs to do but to do in order to do so to truly address the housing crisis we have to let go of that ideology that says government can’t do anything because in the housing markets that are working well they don’t have a lack of Environmental Protection or a lack of planning rules or a lack of collaboration in fact they have the opposite if you look at Germany they have highly collaborative planning practices which mean that the community actually gets input into new developments but because you get the community on board early on even if it makes the process seemed a little bit slower in the end it’s a far better outcome because everybody has participated and you get something that has the buying of the entire community and I knew that the nzd ID not an organization I normally agree with when are in consulting and proposing this f2 they did a study tour in Europe suggesting that four major infrastructure projects it would be better to have a more collaborative process rather than one that gets drawn out you know in appeals but know that what’s proposed in this bill isn’t taking us in a direction of more community input and it certainly isn’t taking us in a direction where government is actually going to be more proactive about master planning because that is what is needed now developers have their place but if you leave it to them they’re just going to maximize profit from a particular piece of land and what we have seen is they’re not providing integrated communities which is what people need for the long term the only place where that’s happening right now is in Hobsonville and that was because it was an initiative of central government under labor with the white a curry district council and housing New Zealand and they master plan de they got community input and they actually provided a complete community with a range of housing options with schools with public transport with all of the infrastructure that you need to have a place a good place to live and that’s not happening anywhere else right now in New Zealand because of this ideological approach taken by the national government which shows government does nothing we just stand aside we remove the red tape for developers and we let them go wild they maximize their profits but where is the long term community the place for people to live for them to work that’s truly affordable the minister has continually gone on about land supply but not all urban land supply is equal houses on the fringe are far more expensive in terms of transport and access to jobs and amenities and infrastructure that has to be provided by local government and until his government acknowledges that transport and housing affordability go together and government needs to be leading the way with infrastructure first and supporting development coordinating development having a master planning process for new developments and redevelopments and then allowing the private sector to develop within the parameters of what the community wants but most importantly the lost opportunity was when his government came in in 2008 2009 all the buildings slowed down and there were people who lost their jobs that was the perfect time for the government to invest in housing and state housing counter-cyclical building is what every other country with a well-functioning housing market does and his government didn’t and that’s why we have a shortage of supply right now it’s not to do with the RMA it’s to do with the lack of action on the part of the national government to build at a time when the private sector wasn’t going to build come back to gallery mine so the Green Party has made numerous constructive contributions we would have liked to seen a royal commission of inquiry to get broad-based support and I think we’re still going to need that if we take seriously what the Productivity Commission has said I don’t believe that this bill as drafted is going to take us at all in the direction that all of the planning experts know will work to deliver affordable quality development for the long term and what New Zealanders really want is environmental protection and for development to be able to happen in a long-term way in a way that you know do it once do it right that’s not something we’ve done in New Zealand for a really long time but we can again if we change the government chairman I’m going to call that dr. Megan woods it’s a pleasure to take my first call here and I want to talk to two of the supplementary auto papers yes it’s right

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