• Articles

    The incredible history of the 2nd Amendment and America’s gun violence problem | Jill Lepore

    One of the more interesting theories about the nature of gun violence in the United States and the quite high homicide rate in the United States, both of which distinguish the United States from other similar nations, has to do with at what moment in time the United States became independent and why the Second Amendment ends up in the Bill of Rights, which is written by Madison. In the theory it is that most states, that is nation states, pursued a historical course that led to the state having a monopoly on violence before the state became fully democratized, that is to say the government essentially seizes the weapons…

  • The Articles of Confederation – Finding Finances – Extra History – #3
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    The Articles of Confederation – Finding Finances – Extra History – #3

    For five years, the Confederation Congress had struggled to fund a national army to fight the American Revolutionary War, but the war kept going and Congress had become dead broke ♫Intro Music ♫ Under the Articles of Confederation, Congress had no real leadership. they elected one of their own members to be President of Congress, but once elected he could only supervise meetings. He couldn’t vote or even suggest new laws. Many saw it as a demotion and a few who did get elected wound up trying to resign only to find out that they were stuck there because nobody wanted to replace them . But now that the Articles…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 23
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 23

    FEDERALIST No. 23. The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union From the New York Packet. Tuesday, December 18, 1787. HAMILTON To the People of the State of New York: THE necessity of a Constitution, at least equally energetic with the one proposed, to the preservation of the Union, is the point at the examination of which we are now arrived. This inquiry will naturally divide itself into three branches—the objects to be provided for by the federal government, the quantity of power necessary to the accomplishment of those objects, the persons upon whom that power ought to operate. Its distribution…

  • The ‘Nightmare’ of a Tweeting President
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    The ‘Nightmare’ of a Tweeting President

    The idea of a tweeting president would have been a Madisonian dystopia. Madison said in Federalist Ten that direct communication between representatives and their constituents was an evil to be avoided because it could hasten mob rule. Think of the president’s tweets. And this is not just President Trump; President Obama was the first tweeting president. Insulting people, putting them down, angrily denouncing them. The American founders Madison and Hamilton fear that mobs, or factions as they call them, were mobilized when they’re animated by passion rather than reason. And to the degree that social media technology makes it possible to have instant polls and to aggregate mobilized minorities or…

  • Alexander Hamilton’s Salacious Sex Scandal (feat. Lin-Manuel Miranda) – Drunk History
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    Alexander Hamilton’s Salacious Sex Scandal (feat. Lin-Manuel Miranda) – Drunk History

    Pretty drunk. [laughs] – You feel okay? – I’m giggly and there’s gaps in my memory. [laughs] – That’s all right. – Already. – Okay, so, uh, let’s get back. – So, Yorktown.We won!Well, now we’ve gotta form a country.Um, they all ask him, hey, come be a part of the Constitutional Convention.So we’re figuring out howthe American system is gonna work.The Constitutional Convention:this is the room where they’re decidingwhat the shape of our government should be.They’re hashing it out.And Hamilton speaks for six hours.But some of the things he pitched would haunt himthe rest of his career.He pitched maybe president for life?[whispering] Ooh, he’s secretly a monarchist.Maybe, uh, we…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 85
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 85

    FEDERALIST No. 85. Concluding Remarks From MCLEAN’s Edition, New York. Wednesday, May 28, 1788 HAMILTON To the People of the State of New York: ACCORDING to the formal division of the subject of these papers, announced in my first number, there would appear still to remain for discussion two points: “the analogy of the proposed government to your own State constitution,” and “the additional security which its adoption will afford to republican government, to liberty, and to property.” But these heads have been so fully anticipated and exhausted in the progress of the work, that it would now scarcely be possible to do any thing more than repeat, in a…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 22
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 22

    FEDERALIST No. 22 The Same Subject Continued (Other Defects of the Present Confederation) From the New York Packet. Friday, December 14, 1787. HAMILTON To the People of the State of New York: IN ADDITION to the defects already enumerated in the existing federal system, there are others of not less importance, which concur in rendering it altogether unfit for the administration of the affairs of the Union. The want of a power to regulate commerce is by all parties allowed to be of the number. The utility of such a power has been anticipated under the first head of our inquiries; and for this reason, as well as from the…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 28
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 28

    FEDERALIST No. 28. The Same Subject Continued (The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered) For the Independent Journal. Wednesday, December 26, 1787 HAMILTON To the People of the State of New York: THAT there may happen cases in which the national government may be necessitated to resort to force, cannot be denied. Our own experience has corroborated the lessons taught by the examples of other nations; that emergencies of this sort will sometimes arise in all societies, however constituted; that seditions and insurrections are, unhappily, maladies as inseparable from the body politic as tumors and eruptions from the natural body; that the idea…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 21
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 21

    FEDERALIST No. 21 Other Defects of the Present Confederation For the Independent Journal. HAMILTON To the People of the State of New York: HAVING in the three last numbers taken a summary review of the principal circumstances and events which have depicted the genius and fate of other confederate governments, I shall now proceed in the enumeration of the most important of those defects which have hitherto disappointed our hopes from the system established among ourselves. To form a safe and satisfactory judgment of the proper remedy, it is absolutely necessary that we should be well acquainted with the extent and malignity of the disease. The next most palpable defect…

  • The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 58
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    The Federalist Papers | Federalist No. 58

    FEDERALIST No. 58. Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands. Considered For the Independent Journal Wednesday, February 20, 1788. MADISON To the People of the State of New York: THE remaining charge against the House of Representatives, which I am to examine, is grounded on a supposition that the number of members will not be augmented from time to time, as the progress of population may demand. It has been admitted, that this objection, if well supported, would have great weight. The following observations will show that, like most other objections against the Constitution, it can only proceed from a partial…