• The man who made the Constitution relevant again
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    The man who made the Constitution relevant again

    Walter Berns was at once a scholar and a patriot. And that, unfortunately, in the contemporary world, in the contemporary America, is kind of rare. Patriotism is not natural, but has to be taught or somehow acquired. And the question was then, and I suppose still is: how was this new patriotism to be taught or somehow acquired by later generations of citizens? On the one hand, he loved the country. He thought that people had to be encouraged to love it for reasons that had been stated by Walter’s great hero, Abraham Lincoln, especially in a free country. It can’t be taken for granted that people will simply love…

  • President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES
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    President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, president vs. congress, does the separation of powers still work? John Charles Daly: Nearly 200 years ago, our founding fathers in the Federalist argued that the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. The preservation of liberty requires that the three great departments of…

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    Religion and the Constitution (1984) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their different views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, “Religion and the Constitution.” John Charles Daly: This public policy forum, one of a series presented by the American Enterprise Institute, is concerned with the relationship of church and state under the Constitution of the United States. Our subject, “Religion and the Constitution.” Our Constitution, hammered out in the long debate in Philadelphia in 1787, went to the States for ratification bearing one reference to religion. Article VI States, “No religious…

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    States vs federal government in education reform — interview with Chris Minnich | VIEWPOINT

    Chris: I would say to some of these folks that have been critical of states, it’s time to get into the states and be critical of them face to face. It’s not time to sit in D.C. and sorta criticize from afar. Like go help them get better. Andy: Chris, thank you so much for being here. Chris: Thanks, Andy. Andy: So, I’ve been talking recently with state-level leaders about what we have learned over the past call it 5, 10, 15 years worth of state-level reform. And I could think of no better person to invite than you, given your role over the last several years. So let’s actually…

  • Freedom of the press: The First Amendment protections (1975) – with Antonin Scalia | ARCHIVES
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    Freedom of the press: The First Amendment protections (1975) – with Antonin Scalia | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute For Public Policy Research presents “Public Policy Forums”, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities, presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. The topic, “Freedom of the Press: The First Amendment Protections.” Should reporters be forced by the courts to reveal confidential sources of information? To what extent should the First Amendment protect the press from libel suits by private citizens? Now, here is Peter Hackes. Peter Hackes: In this bicentennial era as we reexamine some of the great principles on which this country is based, freedom of the press stands out as a cornerstone…

  • Arthur C. Brooks – Bringing America Together
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    Arthur C. Brooks – Bringing America Together

    – What do we do about this deep political polarization problem? That’s what I wanna talk about today. I think that the title that we put on the lecture is “How to Bring America Together”, right, and one of the points I’m gonna make is that we all can be part of the experience and the project of bringing America back together again, and it doesn’t matter if you’re on the left or the right. I wanna talk about some principles that transcend your particular political views and indeed should make us want to come together, especially because we don’t agree. Crazy idea, right? It sounds sort of idealistic, but…

  • Education reform: States vs federal government — interview with Chad Aldeman | VIEWPOINT
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    Education reform: States vs federal government — interview with Chad Aldeman | VIEWPOINT

    Chad: Government can force state and local governments to do things, but they can’t force them to do those things well. Andy: Chad Aldeman, thank you so much for being here with us. Chad: Thank for having me. Andy: Principal at Bellwether Education Partners, we are former colleagues, I hope we’re longtime friends, you can decide after this interview if that’s actually true. So, you are the perfect person if you don’t mind my saying so, to continue this conversation I’ve been having about this ongoing discussion of what is the right balance of power between the federal government and state governments when it comes to K12 Education? So, for…

  • School choice and localism | IN 60 SECONDS
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    School choice and localism | IN 60 SECONDS

    After the 2016 election, some school choice advocates hoped for a huge federal choice initiative. But the last two decades of federal K-12 policy demonstrates why that might not be so wise. Big, bold Washington reforms can misunderstand the important differences between communities; generate bulky, clumsy programs; and as a result, engender resentment among local stakeholders. So choice advocates might thank Uncle Sam for his interest, but ask him to step back. For 25 years, states and locals have led on school choice, and to great effect! Today, three million children attend charters, and another half million are using the various private school choice programs. This has been built on…

  • The Constitution as political theory
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    The Constitution as political theory

    GARY J. SCHMITT: Good evening everybody. Good evening, and welcome to the American Enterprise Institute and our third annual Walter Berns Constitution Day Lecture. My name is Gary Schmitt. I’m the program director for the project on the Program on American Citizenship here at AEI. It’s a great pleasure to introduce this evening’s speaker, James Ceaser, who is the Harry F. Byrd professor of politics at the University of Virginia. It’s a pleasure for a number of reasons, the first being that Jim is someone I’ve known since, God, late ’70s, and has been a friend ever since. He’s also been a particularly good friend since I joined AEI, authoring…

  • Reining in the administrative state | IN 60 SECONDS
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    Reining in the administrative state | IN 60 SECONDS

    In 2017, the administrative agencies of the federal government—which many call the administrative state– issued over 3000 rules and regulations. That sounds like a lot, but they have done that every year since 1993—a total of over 100,000 rules. Complying with all these rules is estimated to cost $2 trillion each year—more than the total taxes paid annually by US businesses and individuals. Congress—and now President Trump–have tried to stanch this flow, but with little success. These efforts have failed because the courts have not done what the Framers of the Constitution expected They were supposed to narrowly interpret the laws that give agencies their rulemaking authority But for many…