• Free speech on campus: Is it in danger? | FACTUAL FEMINIST
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    Free speech on campus: Is it in danger? | FACTUAL FEMINIST

    Is the campus free speech crisis a myth? Some say yes. They tell us not to be distracted by media stories of campus radicals shouting down speakers. “Look at the big picture,” they say. “Free speech is doing just fine.” Are they right? That is coming up next on the Factual Feminist. I was recently invited to Lewis & Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon, to give a lecture making a case for more openness on women’s issues, such as the gender wage gap, or the patriarchal rape culture. These need to be questioned and debated, not accepted as gospel. Women—everyone—are best served by truth—not slogans, much less myths. But…

  • Rights and wrongs of American elections (1996) | THINK TANK
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    Rights and wrongs of American elections (1996) | THINK TANK

    Ben Wattenberg: Hello, I’m Ben Wattenberg. Welcome to Election Year 1996, which we will celebrate with a contest that will be announced at the end of this program. Election year — once again, American democracy is under harsh scrutiny. Many voters are fed up with the tone, the cost, the length, and the unfairness of our elections. But is all the criticism warranted? Joining us for our discussion are Michael Barone, senior writer at US News & World Report and coauthor of “The Almanac of American Politics 1996” and “Our Country: The Shaping of America from Roosevelt to Reagan”; Ronald Walters, chairman of the political science department at Howard University…

  • Would a universal basic income discourage people from working? | IN 60 SECONDS
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    Would a universal basic income discourage people from working? | IN 60 SECONDS

    Television is so glamorous… sorry, I shouldn’t have talked. One of the most persuasive arguments against a universal basic income is the people will stop working. They’ll take the universal basic income, they’ll pool it and they will simply live in idle life. It’s a serious issue and I had to take that into account in the design of the program. And the solution that I came up with is pretty straightforward. As long as people have a job that pays less than thirty thousand dollars a year, they continue to get the full ten thousand dollars. Now there is a certain tax that is levied on after thirty thousand…

  • George Will and Jonah Goldberg — The conservative sensibility | VIEWPOINT
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    George Will and Jonah Goldberg — The conservative sensibility | VIEWPOINT

    George: There are no southern conservative democrats anywhere, there are no liberal republicans anymore. And is everybody happy? I don’t think so. Jonah: Hi, George. Thanks for being here. Delighted to talk to you about “The Conservative Sensibility,” which is just out. And you should know, listeners should know, viewers should know that this will be repurposed for my podcast, “The Remnant.” George: Remnant of what? Jonah: Well, you remember Albert Jay Nock? George: Of course. “Memoirs of the Superfluous Man.” Jonah: That’s right and “My Enemy, the State.” And he wrote a wonderful essay for the “Atlantic Magazine” in I believe 1936 called “Isaiah’s Job.” And it’s one of…

  • Improving prisoner reentry — interview with Grant Duwe | VIEWPOINT
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    Improving prisoner reentry — interview with Grant Duwe | VIEWPOINT

    Grant: As long as we’ve had correctional systems, we’ve been making risk assessment decisions. It’s just the methods that we’ve used to make those decisions have changed over time. Brent: I’m here with Grant Duwe who is academic adviser for Criminal Justice Reform here at the American Enterprise Institute. He is also the director of research for the Minnesota Department of Corrections and he’s here to talk today about two new papers that he has, one on automated risk assessments and a second paper on how we can better time and dose and sequence services for individuals who are getting ready to return from prison. So why don’t you just…

  • America’s success depends on her virtue ft. Professor Robert George | #TruthStraightUp
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    America’s success depends on her virtue ft. Professor Robert George | #TruthStraightUp

    ♪ George: People today talk a lot about the faults and flaws of our founding fathers. They were human beings. They had faults. They had flaws, some serious. They were also men of extraordinary genius, and they bequeathed to us a constitution that really, truly is and should be the envy of the world. They understood something, though: that constitution is actually, at the end of the day, not a machine that will go of itself. Those constitutional structures that protect our liberties, that prevent tyranny by checking government power, the doctrine of federalism, the separation of powers, judicial review, and so forth, judicial review being something, of course, that…

  • Taxpayers’ revolt: Are constitutional limits desirable? (1978) | ARCHIVES
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    Taxpayers’ revolt: Are constitutional limits desirable? (1978) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents public policy forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, Taxpayers’ Revolt, are Constitutional Limits Desirable? Peter Hackes: Hardly a day goes by that there isn’t something new to report on what some are calling the story of the year, the taxpayers’ revolt. It began of course, when the people of California approved Proposition 13, which cut back their property taxes. Since then, taxpayer groups in many other states have developed similar programs to roll back taxes and to limit spending…

  • Social Security: Universal or selective?  (1971) – with Milton Friedman and Wilbur Cohen | ARCHIVES
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    Social Security: Universal or selective? (1971) – with Milton Friedman and Wilbur Cohen | ARCHIVES

    Narrator: Washington debates for the ’70s. A series of debates designed to bring together for an open exchange of views and opinions, outstanding authorities on vital issues facing the world of the ’70s. The topic, “Social Security: Universal or selective.” Now, here is Peter Hackett. Peter Hackes: In our society, people are living longer than ever before. Retirement comes earlier than ever before. Hence, our senior citizens are finding many more years to be lived without the financial security of a job, thus an issue of prime importance to millions of Americans is social security. Despite the fact that social security is a fact of American life and has been…

  • The moral case for universal basic income | IN 60 SECONDS
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    The moral case for universal basic income | IN 60 SECONDS

    The real case for universal basic income in my view is not financial, it is moral. To live a satisfying life a person must spend that life doing important things such as raising a family, holding a job that is satisfying and fulfilling, being a good member of one’s community. For those roles to be satisfying, people have to have responsibility for what those institutions do. Have responsibility for the decisions they make. One of the things that the lucky people in society already have is a life in which they know they can take responsibility for their own actions; they can live the lives they see fit. What a…

  • What would be the immediate effects of a universal basic income? | IN 60 SECONDS
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    What would be the immediate effects of a universal basic income? | IN 60 SECONDS

    The immediate effects of the UBI are twofold. The first is that involuntary poverty will be ended. By involuntary poverty I mean people who are trying real hard, doing the best they can but cannot make enough money to live a decent existence. That kind of poverty goes away with the passage of a universal basic income. A second thing that the UBI does is it utterly changes the incentives facing people. It completely changes the incentives that a woman faces in deciding whether to have a baby, for example. Other things such as retirement for the elderly become much simpler with the universal basic income. Guess what? Social Security…