• The Oath and the Office: A Guide to the Constitution for Future Presidents
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    The Oath and the Office: A Guide to the Constitution for Future Presidents

    Good evening, everyone. It’s great to see so many people here on a beautiful Friday afternoon in Providence, Rhode Island. My name is Richard Locke. I’m a professor of Political Science and international public affairs, and I currently serve as provost. And it’s a great pleasure for me to welcome you to Brown– some of you back to Brown– and all of you to tonight’s Meiklejohn lecture, which is sponsored by the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. Now, before I invite the Taubman Center director, professor Susan Moffitt, to the stage to introduce our distinguished speakers, I want to just offer a few brief remarks about the significance…

  • Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty
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    Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty

    Let’s go ahead and get started. And welcome to today’s conversation on Scott Allard’s new book, Places in Need– The Changing Geography of Poverty. I’m Susan Moffit. I’m the director of the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. And this year the Taubman Center is focusing on three themes– the cost of living, the value of democracy, and the price of security. And Scott’s work speaks very nicely to these themes with his close look at the rise of suburban poverty over the last 25 years, and the challenges that suburban communities are having as they try to address the rising poverty. He writes, “There are more poor people…

  • Should Free Speech be Limited on College Campuses?
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    Should Free Speech be Limited on College Campuses?

    Hi. I’m John Tomasi. Welcome to Brown’s Constitution Day 2016. This is a Janus-style event. And our prompt question for our conversation today is, should free speech be limited on college campuses? Constitution Day is a result of a federal mandate passed in 2004 which requires that all universities that receive federal funding hold events on constitutional issues on or around September 17, the day on which the Constitution was signed. It was, alas, an unfunded mandate. But we’re very fortunate to have a donor who’s been helping, a foundational donor giving foundational support to the Political Theory Project and especially to the Janus Forum that’s sponsoring this evening’s event.…

  • Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Race, Gender, Inequality and Intersectionality”
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    Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Race, Gender, Inequality and Intersectionality”

    So we already heard about both the ideological and material dimensions of contemporary patterns of racial inequality. I’m going to talk about the way that law frames those questions. Now, let’s just pause for moment and knowledge that the frame “black lives matter” could simply be an observational fact, just part of a background reality, no more political or no more contested than the idea that white lives matter, right? The fact that it is a contested frame tells us that there’s still a project going on around race. So what I want to do is frame some part of that project in legal terms. I want to identify “black…

  • The Right to Face Your Accuser: Child Abuse and the Sixth Amendment
    Articles,  Blog

    The Right to Face Your Accuser: Child Abuse and the Sixth Amendment

    OK. Good afternoon, and welcome. I’m Ross Cheit, a professor in political science, and now I’m at the Watson Institute. And I’m delighted to welcome you to Constitution Day. This day is in the nomenclature of public policy and unfunded mandate, if you know the history of Constitution Day. It came in, I think, 2004. Senator Byrd added an amendment to the omnibus funding bill that said all institutions that get federal money have to do an event on Constitution Day that’s an educational event. So here we are. But fortunately, we do have funding. It’s not from the federal government, it’s from the political theory project. So we’re much…