• Teaching with the Records of Congress
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    Teaching with the Records of Congress

    This is a rerecording of the webinar Teaching with the Records of Congress a presentation offered by the Center for Legislative Archives for educators on Thursday April 18, 2019. The Center for Legislative Archives, part of the National Archives and Records Administration preserves and makes available the historical records of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. Educators can use these historical documents to teach about representative democracy, how Congress works, and the important role Congress has played throughout American history. What do we mean when we say the records of Congress? Well since 1789 Congress has legislated, held hearings, or debated nearly every subject you…

  • The Bill of Rights Rap
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    The Bill of Rights Rap

    Alright folks, I’ll help you learn the Bill of Rights. First I got to get some rhythm. I’m Homie G. You all know me. I teach Civics in Henrico County. When I was young, I stayed up nights, trying to learn the Bill of Rights. Now I’ve figured it all out now. I’ve learned them all and I’ll show you how. One, two, three, four. . . One: mouth. Two: arms. Three, no soldiers in our homes. Four: search. Five: fair trial. Six:all trials are in a short while. Seven: jury. Eight:not cruel. Nine’s about rights. Ten: states are cool! Drum solo! Alright now! It’s your turn. Three, two, one,…

  • Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42
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    Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42

    Hello, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re going to talk about something almost every American has an opinion on: interest groups. Now if you’ve been watching these episodes and reading the comments you might be thinking that we’ve been trying to avoid the issue of money in politics and the role of special interests in the U.S. political system. We have. If you are one those people that wants to talk about money in politics, this episode will not disappoint you. I’m kidding, I know that some of you will still be disappointed. But mainly because I’m still not John Green. [Theme Music]…

  • What Constitutional Rights Do Students Have?
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    What Constitutional Rights Do Students Have?

    (percussion music) – [Stephen] Here at Education Week, we’ve been digging deep into how to improve K through 12 civics education. But one thing’s really puzzled us. If the U.S. Constitution is the core document guaranteeing American’s rights, what does that mean for students? There have been a lot of U.S. Supreme Court cases that have taken aim at bits and pieces of this question, but it’s still pretty complicated. – I am a Law Professor at the University of Chicago and I’ve written a book called the Schoolhouse Gate. Essentially, it’s about how the Supreme Court has shaped the nation’s public schools by identifying and protecting students’ constitutional rights.…

  • Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36
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    Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today I’m gonna talk about an aspect of American elections that is probably most familiar to you, at least if you’re an American and you sometimes watch TV, or look at the internet, or read a newspaper, or breathe air. I’m talking about elections, which get a lot of attention here in the US, and on Crash Course, possibly because they present a relatively straight forward narrative, and it’s easy for the media to cover. But we’re not going to focus on media coverage today. No, instead, we’re going to look at why we have elections in the…

  • Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15
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    Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government & Politics, and today, we’re gonna talk about bureaucracies, just as soon as I finish filling out these forms. Do I really have to initial here, here, and here on all three copies, Stan? Regulations say so? All right. I’m just kidding. I don’t really have to fill out forms in triplicate in order to make an episode of Crash Course, but this kind of stuff is one of the main reasons that people don’t like bureaucracies. Americans tend to associate them with incomprehensible rules and time-wasting procedures and probably most annoying – actual bureaucrats. But bureaucracies are a lot like…

  • Teach With TVW: Washington’s Legislative Branch
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    Teach With TVW: Washington’s Legislative Branch

    You may be familiar with how the United States Congress functions, but how does the legislative branch work in Washington State? What are some of the differences between the branches at the state and federal levels? One of the many differences is that, unlike Congress, the Washington State Legislature does not meet year round–it meets part of the year in Olympia. Washington has a citizen legislature, comprised of legislators who have other jobs when the legislature is not in session. The only qualifications for legislators is that they be citizens of the United States and qualified voters in the district from which they are chosen. The Legislature is a bicameral…

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    Judicial Decisions: Crash Course Government and Politics #22

    Craig: Hello, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re gonna look at the Supreme Court from a different angle. We’re gonna try to get inside the justices’ heads. Bwahahahahah! Not literally, obviously, but we’re gonna look at the factors that influence the way they decide cases, other than the structure of the court system. So we’re pretty far away from the Constitution here and straddling the nebulous world of government, politics, and dare I say it, history. [Theme Music] Justices, especially on the Supreme Court, are supposed to be independent, but that doesn’t mean they make their decisions in a vacuum. They make them…

  • Chapter 2 Federalism
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    Chapter 2 Federalism

    [Music] [Music] Glossary Central and State government working together people of particular country for example for example people of India are called Indians. Another example a person born and brought up in America is called an American. income or returns Levels – two or three tier Village Council City Council Topic of chapter two The topic for chapter two is Federalism. Across the world, various countries have two sets of governments that rule the country. One is the Central government and the other is the State government. Both the governments rule the country. For example, in India the major power lies with Central government which is in Delhi. The State…