• Congressional Leadership: Crash Course Government and Politics #8
    Articles,  Blog

    Congressional Leadership: Crash Course Government and Politics #8

    Hi, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to examine the leadership structure of Congress! I know, pretty exciting stuff! Now calm down, let me explain. [Theme Music] Are you ready to talk about Congressional leadership? You better be. So, the Congressional leadership are the Congresspersons with titles like Majority Leader and Minority Whip, and they have a lot to do with political parties, so we’re going to talk about what the political parties do in Congress as well. Even if you don’t follow politics, you probably have heard of the name and titles, if not the functions, of the various leaders. I’m…

  • Congressional Committees: Crash Course Government and Politics #7
    Articles,  Blog

    Congressional Committees: Crash Course Government and Politics #7

    Hi, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re going to get down and dirty wallowing in the mud that is Congress. Okay, maybe that’s a little unfair, but the workings of Congress are kind of arcane or byzantine or maybe let’s just say extremely complex and confusing, like me, or Game of Thrones without the nudity. Some of the nudity, maybe. However, Congress is the most important branch, so it would probably behoove most Americans to know how it works. I’m going to try to explain. Be prepared to be behooved. [Theme Music] Both the House of Representatives and the Senate are divided up…

  • The US Federal Court System: Why do the courts even matter?
    Articles,  Blog

    The US Federal Court System: Why do the courts even matter?

    We’ve got courts full of judges, and judges full of judicial philosophies. But we’re talking about a bunch of old lawyers wearing funny costumes that I didn’t even get to vote for – are we sure that they’re all that relevant to my life? Well that’s a hard yes. The courts might be the most underrated branch of government when it comes to how much influence they have on your everyday life. While Congress is coming up with laws with a lot of fancy language you and I might never read, the courts help us figure out how federal law actually works IRL, using – well, still fancy language. Now…

  • How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone
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    How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone

    There’s a job out there with a great deal of power, pay, prestige, and near-perfect job security. And there’s only one way to be hired: get appointed to the US Supreme Court. If you want to become a justice on the Supreme Court, the highest federal court in the United States, three things have to happen. You have to be nominated by the president of the United States, your nomination needs to be approved by the Senate, and finally, the president must formally appoint you to the court. Because the Constitution doesn’t specify any qualifications, in other words, that there’s no age, education, profession, or even native-born citizenship requirement, a…

  • Red Flag Laws | Constitution Corner
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    Red Flag Laws | Constitution Corner

    I’m Dr. Duke and this is Constitution Corner well Constitution Corner is one of my favorite segments of the week because it gets us to reflect not necessarily on this amendment or that codicil but to reflect on what the Constitution says about our modern world and the big issue again today I think for the Constitution is these are these red flag laws and you know it’s a very very difficult what are those issues that forces people into a very serious discussion of civics on the one hand you have these random shootings which trouble everybody they are frustrating the level of emotion when these shootings occur is…

  • Articles

    What you might not know about the Declaration of Independence – Kenneth C. Davis

    “All men are created equal and they are endowed with the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Not so fast, Mr. Jefferson! These words from the Declaration of Independence, and the facts behind them, are well known. In June of 1776, a little more than a year after the war against England began with the shots fired at Lexington and Concord, the Continental Congress was meeting in Philadelphia to discuss American independence. After long debates, a resolution of independence was approved on July 2, 1776. America was free! And men like John Adams thought we would celebrate that date forever. But it was two days later that…

  • Teaching with the Records of Congress
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    Teaching with the Records of Congress

    This is a rerecording of the webinar Teaching with the Records of Congress a presentation offered by the Center for Legislative Archives for educators on Thursday April 18, 2019. The Center for Legislative Archives, part of the National Archives and Records Administration preserves and makes available the historical records of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. Educators can use these historical documents to teach about representative democracy, how Congress works, and the important role Congress has played throughout American history. What do we mean when we say the records of Congress? Well since 1789 Congress has legislated, held hearings, or debated nearly every subject you…

  • The Bill of Rights Rap
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    The Bill of Rights Rap

    Alright folks, I’ll help you learn the Bill of Rights. First I got to get some rhythm. I’m Homie G. You all know me. I teach Civics in Henrico County. When I was young, I stayed up nights, trying to learn the Bill of Rights. Now I’ve figured it all out now. I’ve learned them all and I’ll show you how. One, two, three, four. . . One: mouth. Two: arms. Three, no soldiers in our homes. Four: search. Five: fair trial. Six:all trials are in a short while. Seven: jury. Eight:not cruel. Nine’s about rights. Ten: states are cool! Drum solo! Alright now! It’s your turn. Three, two, one,…

  • Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42
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    Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42

    Hello, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re going to talk about something almost every American has an opinion on: interest groups. Now if you’ve been watching these episodes and reading the comments you might be thinking that we’ve been trying to avoid the issue of money in politics and the role of special interests in the U.S. political system. We have. If you are one those people that wants to talk about money in politics, this episode will not disappoint you. I’m kidding, I know that some of you will still be disappointed. But mainly because I’m still not John Green. [Theme Music]…