• The Try Guys Try Immigrating To America
    Articles,  Blog

    The Try Guys Try Immigrating To America

    – Torture convention? What’s a torture convention? Is that like Comic-Con but for assholes? (laughing) Immigration. (upbeat music) – Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, sometimes. – Today, we’re gonna find out what does it take to get into America. Am I allowed to lie on this test? – Okay. – Both my parents are immigrants. But I have no idea what the steps are. I don’t know if they had to, like, submit head shots, or do like an audition reel. Hello, my name is Jay. I like freedom, rap music, and I like cowboy boots. American now? – Well, I’m Hiroshi…

  • Discrimination: Crash Course Government and Politics #31
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    Discrimination: Crash Course Government and Politics #31

    Hi, I’m Craig. And this is Crash Course: Government and Politics. And today we’re going to try to wrap up the incredibly fun and uplifting subject of equal protection and discrimination. Because if you thought the fourteenth amendment only protected racial and religious minorities and maybe women to some degree, then you’ve underestimated the power of what I call the most important amendment to the Constitution. – Typical leftie nonsense. You haven’t even mentioned the second amendment, the one that gives us the real power to protect ourselves from government overreach. If you’re a member of a well-regulated militia, you mean. Right? Oh! Hey guys. Haven’t seen you in a…

  • Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40
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    Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40

    Hi, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re gonna talk about parties. Woo! Yeah! No, not those kind of parties. We’re talking about political parties, which can be a lot less fun. Woo. [Theme Music] So, today we’re talking about why we have political parties and the role of parties in American politics. But before we dive into the pool – some would say a cesspool – that is political parties, let’s have a definition. Political party: a team of politicians, activists and voters whose goal is to win control of government. So kind of an important point: the goal of a party is…

  • The Bill of Rights and Other Amendments
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    The Bill of Rights and Other Amendments

    As our country has grown and changed over time, the Constitution has also needed to change. When the Constitution was written in 1787, some representatives believed that it did not strongly protect the rights of the people. So, a few years later, Congress agreed to make important changes to the Constitution. Changes to the Constitution are called amendments. In 1791 Congress added ten important amendments. These ten amendments are called the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights defines some basic rights of people in the U.S. and limits government power. The First Amendment of the Bill of Rights is very important. The First Amendment protects some of the most…

  • Teach With TVW: The Washington State Constitution
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    Teach With TVW: The Washington State Constitution

    In the late 1800s, railroad access brought thousands of European American homesteaders from the eastern United States to the Washington Territory. These settlers sought to govern themselves and Washington was set on the path to statehood. A new state constitution was created in 1889 and Washington became the 42nd state. But why did Washington settlers wish to create a government of their own? What were their concerns at the time and how were these issues reflected in the Washington State Constitution? We were a predominantly agricultural state. The vast majority of Washingtonians either lived on farms or small rural towns that were servicing the agricultural sector. People on farms had…

  • How is power divided in the United States government? – Belinda Stutzman
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    How is power divided in the United States government? – Belinda Stutzman

    Translator: Andrea McDonough Reviewer: Bedirhan Cinar Have you ever wondered who has the authority to make laws or punish people who break them? When we think of power in the United States, we usually think of the President, but he does not act alone. In fact, he is only one piece of the power puzzle and for very good reason. When the American Revolution ended in 1783, the United States government was in a state of change. The founding fathers knew that they did not want to establish another country that was ruled by a king, so the discussions were centered on having a strong and fair national government that…

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    Inventing the American presidency – Kenneth C. Davis

    Translator: Andrea McDonough Reviewer: Bedirhan Cinar The Oval Office, Inauguration Day, Rose Garden signings, and secret service agents with dark sunglasses and cool wrist radios. For a moment, forget all of it. Toss out everything you know about the President. Now, start over. What would you do if you had to invent the President? That was the question facing the 55 men who got together in secret to draw up the plans for a new American government in the summer of 1787 in Philadelphia, in the same place where the Declaration of Independence had been written eleven years earlier. Declaring independence had been risky business, demanding ferocious courage that put…

  • Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29
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    Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29

    Hi I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to finally get into why many people, including me, think that the Fourteenth Amendment is the most important part of the Constitution. At the same time, we will attempt – successfully, I hope – to unravel the difference between civil liberties and civil rights, and also try to figure out how the Supreme Court actually looks at civil rights and civil liberties cases. So that’s a lot. Let’s get this out of the way because we’re not gonna have time later. Let’s get started. [Theme Music] So we’ve been talking a lot in the past…

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    Search and Seizure: Crash Course Government and Politics #27

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today, we’re gonna continue our discussion of the Bill of Rights, and talk about something that may actually be useful to you. We’re gonna talk about when the police are allowed to search your house, your car, and even you. But not me. I have immunity. I’m on YouTube. Right, is that how it works, Stan? It’s not how it works? I’m in trouble. You might think that this only matters if you are, you know, a criminal, and if you are, then you should be paying close attention, but even if you haven’t committed any crimes and…

  • Freedom of Speech: Crash Course Government and Politics #25
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    Freedom of Speech: Crash Course Government and Politics #25

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today, we’re talking about free speech. Other Craig: Finally, today we can let loose and establish the kinds of things we can say to criticize our government, like the crazy idea that money and speech are the same thing. Other Other Craig: Not so fast, Clone, the Supreme Court has ruled that spending money, at least in the political context, is speech. You do have the right to criticize that decision though. Unless your boss or YouTube says that you can’t. Craig: All right, we’re trying to talk about free speech, shut up. Let’s get started and see…