• Constitutional Convention and a New Bill of Rights in 2017.  By Daniel Bruno
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    Constitutional Convention and a New Bill of Rights in 2017. By Daniel Bruno

    Hello my name is daniel bruno today is the 11th of September 2017 In this conversation I will present to you my ideas for a new bill of rights in the United States My belief that we need a constitutional convention in the United States And My proposal for a new national anthem of the United States The 11th of September 2001 is a Day, which will live in infamy Because that was the day That terrorists struck the city of New York I Remember exactly where I was and what I was doing on that morning and the rest of the day I Was born on the island of…

  • Articles

    Does the NSA Violate Your Constitutional Rights? | Learn Liberty

    Many people don’t know what their constitutional freedoms are or why they have them in the first place. They’ve gotten so used to the freedoms they’ve enjoyed as Americans that they haven’t noticed just how rare and fragile they really are. Before America’s founding, the British king George III would issue what were called general warrants, which empowered local authorities to look for wrongdoing anywhere and to use their discretion to find any kind of treasonous behavior, including among the people that would come to be our Founders. But this became such an abuse of dictatorial authority that after the Revolutionary War a prohibition on general warrants was written right…

  • Ron Paul on Gay Marriage
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    Ron Paul on Gay Marriage

    Congressman Paul, to you, on the subject of one of the core debates in the party, over social issues: gay marriage. You’ve been quoted as saying, Any association that’s voluntary should be permissible in a free society. And you’ve expressed your opposition to a constitutional ban on gay marriage. Many of your rivals on that stage disagree. Why are they wrong? I’m afraid I haven’t been able to get most of your question. I know you brought up the subject of gay marriage, but I didn’t get the point of what you’re saying. I can’t hear it that well. Why are on those stage who support a constitutional amendment banning…

  • The Marriage Cases: Legal Challenges to Prop 8 and DOMA
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    The Marriage Cases: Legal Challenges to Prop 8 and DOMA

    The 14th Amendment guarantees liberty and the equal protection of the law to every American. When a state refuses to recognize a marriage of two people of the same sex, is it violating those principles? Or when the federal government decides not to recognize a marriage that is legal in a state, is that a federal overreach? These are the questions that are before the Court in two cases in 2013. However the Court decides the cases, they raise underlying and enduring questions about liberty that all of us should care about. One case challenges a California State law popularly known as Prop 8, which was passed by the voters…

  • What are the universal human rights? – Benedetta Berti
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    What are the universal human rights? – Benedetta Berti

    The idea of human rights is that each one of us, no matter who we are or where we are born, is entitled to the same basic rights and freedoms. Human rights are not privileges, and they cannot be granted or revoked. They are inalienable and universal. That may sound straighforward enough, but it gets incredibly complicated as soon as anyone tries to put the idea into practice. What exactly are the basic human rights? Who gets to pick them? Who enforces them, and how? The history behind the concept of human rights is a long one. Throughout the centuries and across societies, religions, and cultures we have struggled with…

  • Historical Context of the Human Rights Act 1998
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    Historical Context of the Human Rights Act 1998

    not until the aftermath of World War Two and its atrocities did issues concerning civil liberties and human rights once more gained worldwide attention at that point there was political resolve and popular support to have stronger monitoring and enforcement of minimum international standards of human rights. The United Nations was formed in 1948 and one of its first acts was the adoption the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, it established a fundamental set of standards for countries to follow, however the declaration was limited in the individuals could not enforce these rights against governments at the same time as the United Nations declaration was being written there was a…

  • Texas v. Johnson Summary | quimbee.com
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    Texas v. Johnson Summary | quimbee.com

    – [Narrator] The First Amendment protects free speech, including expressive conduct. But does it shield someone burning the American flag in protest? In Texas versus Johnson, the United State Supreme Court answered that question. In 1984, Gregory Lee Johnson participated in a protest of the Republican National Convention. Outside the Dallas City Hall, Johnson doused an American flag with kerosene and set it on fire. As the flag burned, protesters chanted quote, “America the red, white, and blue, “we spit on you,” unquote. Johnson was charged with desecration of a venerated object under Texas law. The trial court convicted Johnson, fining him $2,000 and sentencing him to one year in…

  • Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29
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    Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29

    Hi I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to finally get into why many people, including me, think that the Fourteenth Amendment is the most important part of the Constitution. At the same time, we will attempt – successfully, I hope – to unravel the difference between civil liberties and civil rights, and also try to figure out how the Supreme Court actually looks at civil rights and civil liberties cases. So that’s a lot. Let’s get this out of the way because we’re not gonna have time later. Let’s get started. [Theme Music] So we’ve been talking a lot in the past…

  • Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23
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    Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re finally, at long last, moving on from the structures and branches of government and onto the structures and branches of trees. This is a nature show now. Okay, we’re not moving on completely, because we’re still talking about courts, but today we’ll be discussing actual court decisions, and the kind of things that courts rule on, rather than how they do it. That’s right, we’re moving onto civil rights and civil liberties. [Theme Music] Okay, first I want to talk about something that I find confusing: the difference between civil rights and civil liberties. Usually in…