• Reinforcement Learning: Crash Course AI#9
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    Reinforcement Learning: Crash Course AI#9

    Hey, I’m Jabril and welcome to Crash Course AI. Say I want to get a cookie from a jar that’s on a tall shelf. There isn’t one “right way” to get the cookies. Maybe I find a ladder, use a lasso, or build a complicated system of pulleys. These could all be brilliant or terrible ideas, but if something works, I get the sweet taste of victory… and I learn that doing that same thing could get me another cookie in the future. We learn lots of things by trial-and-error, and this kind of “learning by doing” to achieve complicated goals is called Reinforcement Learning. INTRO So far, we’ve talked…

  • Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42
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    Interest Groups: Crash Course Government and Politics #42

    Hello, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re going to talk about something almost every American has an opinion on: interest groups. Now if you’ve been watching these episodes and reading the comments you might be thinking that we’ve been trying to avoid the issue of money in politics and the role of special interests in the U.S. political system. We have. If you are one those people that wants to talk about money in politics, this episode will not disappoint you. I’m kidding, I know that some of you will still be disappointed. But mainly because I’m still not John Green. [Theme Music]…

  • Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36
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    Election Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #36

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today I’m gonna talk about an aspect of American elections that is probably most familiar to you, at least if you’re an American and you sometimes watch TV, or look at the internet, or read a newspaper, or breathe air. I’m talking about elections, which get a lot of attention here in the US, and on Crash Course, possibly because they present a relatively straight forward narrative, and it’s easy for the media to cover. But we’re not going to focus on media coverage today. No, instead, we’re going to look at why we have elections in the…

  • Intolerable Acts & Tea Act – Pre American Revolution Monetary System
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    Intolerable Acts & Tea Act – Pre American Revolution Monetary System

    u.s. monetary history chapter 5 the Intolerable Acts of King George and the Sons of Liberty when we last saw the colonies they just successfully financed the French and Indian War without the use of inflationary monetary policies as shown by the prior chapter not all Fiat paper money was a failure such as the Pennsylvania colonial script we’ll explore how the colonies lost the freedom to print interest-free paper money and the axle would threaten to dry the colonies of their last remaining medium of exchange silver species the refusal of King George to allow the colonies to operate an honest money system which freed the ordinary man from…

  • Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15
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    Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government & Politics, and today, we’re gonna talk about bureaucracies, just as soon as I finish filling out these forms. Do I really have to initial here, here, and here on all three copies, Stan? Regulations say so? All right. I’m just kidding. I don’t really have to fill out forms in triplicate in order to make an episode of Crash Course, but this kind of stuff is one of the main reasons that people don’t like bureaucracies. Americans tend to associate them with incomprehensible rules and time-wasting procedures and probably most annoying – actual bureaucrats. But bureaucracies are a lot like…

  • Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34
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    Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34

    Thomas Aquinas was no dummy. Remember him? The Italian fella? Christian monk? Philosophical superstar of the 13th century? Aquinas thought morality was important for everyone, and that being a good person was a vital part of God’s plan for each of us. But he knew that not everyone had been exposed to the Bible, or had even heard of God. So, what bothered him was: How could people follow God’s moral rules – also known as the divine commands – if they didn’t even know about the guy who made the commandments? Aquinas just couldn’t believe that God would have expectations for us, if he didn’t also give us –…

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    Judicial Decisions: Crash Course Government and Politics #22

    Craig: Hello, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re gonna look at the Supreme Court from a different angle. We’re gonna try to get inside the justices’ heads. Bwahahahahah! Not literally, obviously, but we’re gonna look at the factors that influence the way they decide cases, other than the structure of the court system. So we’re pretty far away from the Constitution here and straddling the nebulous world of government, politics, and dare I say it, history. [Theme Music] Justices, especially on the Supreme Court, are supposed to be independent, but that doesn’t mean they make their decisions in a vacuum. They make them…

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    What Can You Learn from Your Competition?: Crash Course Business Entrepreneurship #4

    We’re used to competitions with clear winners and losers: baseball games, math olympiads, pie-eating contests, and games involving thrones. We crown a victor and everyone else goes home empty-handed [– or when you play the game of thrones, you win or you die.] In business, though, there isn’t just one winner. In today’s world, there are very few actual monopolies, or markets with a single seller. Participation trophies actually mean something! So as entrepreneurs, we have to take stock in the middle of the competition, and ask the question: “how competitive am I?” Our competitors are more than happy to answer this for us — maybe not with words, but…

  • Freedom of Religion: Crash Course Government and Politics #24
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    Freedom of Religion: Crash Course Government and Politics #24

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and I’m excited. I’m excited because today, we start delving into Supreme Court jurisprudence, with the totally controversial topic of freedom of religion. Now, other than being fun to say, jurisprudence means all the important cases on a particular topic, but unfortunately, I’m only going to be talking about a couple of them, because they demonstrate how the Supreme Court reasons its way through a tricky issue. Jurisprudence. Jurisprudence. [Theme Music] So the Constitution deals with religion right there in the First Amendment, which is also the one that deals with speech and the press and assembly and petitions.…

  • Public Opinion: Crash Course Government and Politics #33
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    Public Opinion: Crash Course Government and Politics #33

    Hello, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to begin our discussion of politics, rather than government. Aren’t they the same thing, Stan? Aren’t they the… They’re not the same? Oh… I know some of you are saying that we’ve been talking about politics all along, and in a sense, that’s true. But for the rest of the series we’ll be looking more closely at policies and the factors that influence how they’re made, rather than the institutions and structures that make them. One way to think about this is that “government” describes the what, the who, and the how of policies. And…