• Articles

    Duke alumna Symonne Singleton’s Voting Rights Story

    I’m here today to tell you guys a story and I hope that by the end of it we can uncover some insights and raise some questions about what can occur when the government loses sight of the people it’s meant to empower and to serve. My first time voting was in 2014. I was a sophomore here at Duke, so it seemed like a pretty straightforward thing. You’re registered to vote. You go to the polling place. You vote. Great, civic duty. So I did, I registered to vote here on campus showed up to my polling place a few weeks later. I showed up in the evening because…

  • Legislative v. Constitutional Remedies (Money Out Voters In Conference)
    Articles,  Blog

    Legislative v. Constitutional Remedies (Money Out Voters In Conference)

    now introduce an amazing panel alert lessig is the roy furman professor of law at harvard law school the director of the admin js epicenter ethics at harvard university appreciate for those some contests thank you tank and uh… and i’m very happy b on this panel to because i think it’s really important that place these different reform movements in context i don’t accept the framing about question in the panel which is constitutional verses legislative i don’t believe in versus here i think we have to learn to walk and chew gum in tweet at the same time cancio absolutely support the constitutional reform movements uh… in all…

  • Brexit & The Constitution: SOVEREIGN PARLIAMENT trumped by SOVEREIGN PEOPLE:  Prof. Vernon Bogdanor
    Articles,  Blog

    Brexit & The Constitution: SOVEREIGN PARLIAMENT trumped by SOVEREIGN PEOPLE: Prof. Vernon Bogdanor

    At a seminar at my institution, King’s College London, a recent seminar, the professor of European law, Takis Tridimas, declared that this referendum in 2016 was the most significant constitutional event in Britain since the Reformation of 1660. And he said this because the referendum showed — or perhaps confirmed — that on the issue of Europe, the sovereignty of the people trumped the sovereignty of Parliament; and brexit is coming about despite the fact that the vast majority of MPs supported remain, a majority of the cabinet including the Prime Minister supported remain, and a large majority in the House of Lords support remain. So brexit is coming about…

  • ‘Free Speech and Youths,’ With Mary Beth Tinker
    Articles,  Blog

    ‘Free Speech and Youths,’ With Mary Beth Tinker

    MICAH SCHWARTZMAN: Welcome, everyone. My name is Micah Schwartzman, and I’m the director of the Karsh Center for Law and Democracy, which is one of the sponsors of this conference, with the Virginia Law Review, along with an impressive range of student groups. I’ll just read you the list, the American Constitution Society, Black Law Students Association, Child Advocacy Research and Education, the Federalist Society, Latin American Law Organization, Law Innovation Security and Technology, the Middle Eastern and Northern African Law Student Association, the Minority Rights Coalition, and the Rex E. Lee Law Society. It’s notable, I think that such a diverse group of student groups, which often represent very…

  • Tyranny comes home: How the ‘boomerang effect’ impacts civilian life in the U.S. | Abigail Blanco
    Articles,  Blog

    Tyranny comes home: How the ‘boomerang effect’ impacts civilian life in the U.S. | Abigail Blanco

    So what a lot of people don’t think about with respect to foreign intervention is the idea that the tools and processes that are developed as a part of foreign intervention can come to be used domestically. So people might not associate, for example, things like the use of drones domestically within the United States or unmanned aerial vehicles, torture in U.S. prisons or things like the militarization of domestic police as consequences of foreign intervention. But these are the exact types of tools developed as a part of intervention abroad that then wind up being used back home. My coauthor, Chris Coyne, and I term this phenomenon the boomerang…

  • Lincoln’s law: How did the Civil War change the Constitution? | James Stoner | Big Think
    Articles,  Blog

    Lincoln’s law: How did the Civil War change the Constitution? | James Stoner | Big Think

    The United States Constitution is certainly dedicated to the rule of law. John Adams famously said, quoting Harrington who himself is quoting Aristotle or alluding to Aristotle, that the United States aims to establish the rule of law not the rule of men. And the Constitution lays out a number of rules about how governments should act. Some of that is involved in creating new institutions and defining those institutions in a way summoning them into being and some of it is about putting restrictions on institutions that are already there or practices that are unavoidable. So, when does the rule of law and the rule of men or something…

  • How Left/Right Partisanship Starts a Civil War in Spain | BETWEEN 2 WARS I 1936 Part 2 of 4
    Articles,  Blog

    How Left/Right Partisanship Starts a Civil War in Spain | BETWEEN 2 WARS I 1936 Part 2 of 4

    I suppose you could call the Spanish Civil War World War Two’s practice run. The mass killings, industrial warfare, and blurring of lines between civilians and combatants that we will see in the years 1939 to 1945 will already happen from 1936-1939 on the Iberian Peninsula. But how has Spain, a country which has mostly kept itself out of international affairs, found itself in this position? Why has it become such a powder keg? As we will soon see, the pre-war Spanish Republic is rife with violence and strife. In its short life, it will be continually rocked by revolution, uprisings, and coups. Its defeat is never inevitable, but it…