• The Role of Local Government | City of Greater Dandenong
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    The Role of Local Government | City of Greater Dandenong

    Governments are groups of people given responsibility for looking after various aspects of our lives and the community. Governments are formed through fair and democratic elections. Voters choose which person they wish to represent them at all levels. Voting is compulsory for people over the age of 18. In Australia, there are three levels of government. The Federal Government looks after the whole of Australia. Their responsibilities include The State Governments look after individual states and territories. Victoria’s state government looks after services such as Local Government, such as the City of Greater Dandenong, looks after specific areas within each state. Each local government area varies in size and population.…

  • Law and Justice – Roman Constitution – 10.1 The Roman Constitution
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    Law and Justice – Roman Constitution – 10.1 The Roman Constitution

    >>>>The idea of republicanism was the first great contribution of the Romans to the history of law and justice. Let’s turn now to the Roman Constitution, the way the Romans organized power in the period of the Republic. This is the second great contribution of the Romans to the history of politics. The Roman Constitution during the Republic has been one of the most influential political experiments in all of human history. And to understand the Roman Constitution in this period, there’s no better guide for us than a Greek observer named Polybius. Polybius was brought to Rome in the aftermath of the Roman conquest of Greece. We turn now…

  • Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
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    Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] Hey, this is Kim from Khan Academy, and today I’m learning about Article I of the U.S. Constitution. Article I is jam packed with information about how our government is supposed to work, but principally what it does is create the Legislative Branch of government, which includes the House of Representatives, and the Senate, which together, comprise the Congress of the United States. Article I also tells us how people can get elected to those bodies, and what powers Congress has. To learn more about Article I, I talked to two Constitutional experts. Ilya Somin is a professor of law at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George…

  • President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES
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    President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, president vs. congress, does the separation of powers still work? John Charles Daly: Nearly 200 years ago, our founding fathers in the Federalist argued that the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. The preservation of liberty requires that the three great departments of…

  • The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What I want you to do in this video is a little bit more of a deep dive into the House of Representatives. Now we’ve already talked about how either chamber of Congress can introduce general legislation. And if it gets approved by one chamber, it has to be voted on and approved by the other chamber. But the House of Representatives has some specific constitutional powers. So for example, impeachment proceedings would start in the House of Representatives. In other videos we have talked about impeachment is not the removal from office, of say the president, it is just a formal indictment. Now if the House of…

  • The Most Successful People Explain Why a College Degree is USELESS
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    The Most Successful People Explain Why a College Degree is USELESS

    Well, often times Business Education today, and I see it all the time Kids come out of college, the best colleges Wharton and Harvard and Stanford and some of the great business schools and they’ll come out and they won’t have practical experience. There’s too many case studies that aren’t practical. You know, we ask kids that are 16 to 18 years old to make $100,000 debt decisions when they go off to University, and they are not prepared for that. They don’t know what they’re getting themselves into, they just assume ‘Okay, I’m gonna pay four years of education at twenty-five thousand a pop and when I come out…

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    Paul Fletcher MP speaks on the Higher Education and Research Reform Amendment Bill 2014

    I am pleased to rise to speak on the Higher Education and Research Reform Amendment Bill 2014. This is an important bill which will expand opportunities for students, in particular disadvantaged and rural and regional students, and ensure that Australia has a world-class tertiary education system. This bill has been significantly amended, when compared to the bill that went through the House of Representatives but not the Senate last year, but nevertheless it preserves the essential elements of the higher education reform policy package, which the Abbott government and Minister Pyne are pursuing. In the time available to me this evening, I want to make three arguments: firstly, that universities…

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    What Can You Learn from Your Competition?: Crash Course Business Entrepreneurship #4

    We’re used to competitions with clear winners and losers: baseball games, math olympiads, pie-eating contests, and games involving thrones. We crown a victor and everyone else goes home empty-handed [– or when you play the game of thrones, you win or you die.] In business, though, there isn’t just one winner. In today’s world, there are very few actual monopolies, or markets with a single seller. Participation trophies actually mean something! So as entrepreneurs, we have to take stock in the middle of the competition, and ask the question: “how competitive am I?” Our competitors are more than happy to answer this for us — maybe not with words, but…

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    Constitutional change and democratic renewal | Sir Geoffrey Palmer | TEDxVUW

    Translator: Ivana Krivokuća Reviewer: Peter van de Ven Kia ora koutou. It’s a really great pleasure for me to talk to you tonight about how we are governed, about constitutional change. We are one of the world’s oldest democracies, but I think we need some democratic renewal. I came to this university, the very university where this talk is being recorded, in 1960 to study law and politics, and I became absolutely fascinated with how this country is governed. I became so interested in it that I became a law professor, and I’ve taught constitutional law in four countries. I once taught it to American students in France, but I…

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    Religion and the Constitution (1984) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their different views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, “Religion and the Constitution.” John Charles Daly: This public policy forum, one of a series presented by the American Enterprise Institute, is concerned with the relationship of church and state under the Constitution of the United States. Our subject, “Religion and the Constitution.” Our Constitution, hammered out in the long debate in Philadelphia in 1787, went to the States for ratification bearing one reference to religion. Article VI States, “No religious…