• Articles

    Were Federalist Really Your Friends

    United States Department Of Justice: The United States Department of Justice (DOJ), also known as the Justice Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for the enforcement of the law and administration of justice, equivalent to the justice or interior ministries of other countries. The Department is led by the Attorney General, who is nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate and is a member of the Cabinet. The “Act to Establish the Department of Justice” drastically increased the Attorney General’s responsibilities to include the supervision of all United States Attorneys, formerly under the Department of the Interior, the prosecution of all federal crimes, and the representation…

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    Your Legislators: Federal Real ID Act (March 31, 2016)

    AMENDMENT WE COULD PUT ON THE BILL. BILL. >>Barry: WE HAVE A COUPLE OF>>Barry: WE HAVE A COUPLE OF ISSUES THAT I DON’T THINK WILL ISSUES THAT I DON’T THINK WILL TAKE MUCH TIME. TAKE MUCH TIME. A IS GOING ON WITH THE FEDERAL A IS GOING ON WITH THE FEDERAL REAL I.D. ACT. REAL I.D. ACT. COULD BE IMPORTANT TO PEOPLE COULD BE IMPORTANT TO PEOPLE GETTING ON AIRPLANES. GETTING ON AIRPLANES. ANYBODY GOING TO UPDATE US ON ANYBODY GOING TO UPDATE US ON THIS QUICKLY? THIS QUICKLY? >>I AM ON THE TRANSPORTATION>>I AM ON THE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE. COMMITTEE. SENATOR EKEN I DON’T KNOW IF YOU SENATOR EKEN I…

  • Texas vs DC: States Can Impact the Federal Resettlement Program
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    Texas vs DC: States Can Impact the Federal Resettlement Program

    States do have the ability to impact the federal government’s refugee resettlement program. As was widely reported last week, Texas Governor Greg Abbott has officially told the national Office of Refugee Resettlement that if certain conditions aren’t met, the state will be withdrawing from the federal resettlement program. Of course, the New York Times quickly downplayed the impact of Texas withdrawing from the program. But the practical realities look different. The state provides vital logistic medical and social service assistance. Texas manages $96 million in federal funds for services provided to refugees. And last year alone it resettled some seven thousand refugees. Several non-profits such as the International Rescue Committee,…

  • United States v.  Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    United States v. Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What we’re going to do in this video is talk about a relatively recent U.S. Supreme Court case, and this is the United States versus Lopez, and the decision was made in 1995. And this is significant because many of the cases we have talked about are things that broadened the power of the federal government. While the decision in United States versus Lopez, which was a split decision, it was a five-to-four decision, put some limits on federal power. And so just to understand what happened. In 1990, the U.S. Congress passes the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990. And it says, “It shall be unlawful for…

  • Nullify! Chapter 14: Anti-Commandeering
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    Nullify! Chapter 14: Anti-Commandeering

    To stop federal acts, James Madison recommended a “refusal to cooperate with officers of the Union.” Over 170 years of supreme court precedent supports this strategy too. Known as the “anti-commandeering doctrine,” in four major cases dating back to 1842, the Supreme Court has held that the federal government cannot require states to use personnel or resources to help the federal government carry out its acts or regulatory programs. In the 1842 Prigg case, Justice Joseph Story wrote that the federal government could not force states to implement or carry out the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793. He said that it was a federal law, and the federal government ultimately…

  • “Few and Defined,” not “Anything and Everything.”
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    “Few and Defined,” not “Anything and Everything.”

    The powers of the federal government are “few and defined.” Today, the federal government claims the authority to do just about everything under the sun, from telling us what kind of plants we can grow in our backyard, to regulating the amount of water in our toilets. This is not what was promised During the ratification debates, opponents of the constitution feared the “whole mass of powers” held by the federal government would overwhelm the powers reserved to the States. In Federalist paper #45, James Madison forcefully argued that the constitution wasn’t set up that way. He wrote that the powers delegated to the federal government were “few and defined.”…

  • 22. The Road to a Constitutional Convention
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    22. The Road to a Constitutional Convention

    Prof: Coming in to the home stretch. We’re moving towards the Constitution; it’s kind of amazing, kind of weird. And so, as a matter of fact, that’s what we’re going to be doing with today’s lecture, which is going to get us on the road to the Federal Convention. Now just a quick review before we plunge down the road. On Thursday, as I hope you all remember, I talked about some of the problems of the Articles of Confederation and I talked about things that caused confusion or complications like boundaries between states; I talked about Vermont; I talked about the state of Franklin; I talked about Shays’ Rebellion,…

  • Dear Colleague: Guidance Documents & Executive Agencies [POLICYbrief]
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    Dear Colleague: Guidance Documents & Executive Agencies [POLICYbrief]

    In 2014, the Department of Education and the Department of Justice jointly issued a Dear Colleague letter on school discipline policies. A Dear Colleague letter is a form of guidance document. They put out a guidance document that proposed to enforce disparate impact theories under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. Uh, within months after they put that guidance document out, they were in school districts. In, in my hometown of Milwaukee, that school district entered a consent decree with the Department of Education where they agreed to completely change their school discipline policy. That has significant, real-world consequences, and that was all the direct result of the guidance…

  • 23. Creating a Constitution
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    23. Creating a Constitution

    Prof: Before we begin, I have to make a true confession to you, my class, because you’re my class, and I have been confessing things all semester but this is– I basically set myself up for this failure and then realized– at the end of the class someone came up to me and asked me a question, and then I realized–Gaa! Okay. So remember how I told you how at UVA for five straight years I forgot Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, even though everything closed? Yeah. Guess what I didn’t say on Tuesday? I forgot it was Thomas Jefferson’s birthday. [laughter] I completely forgot. Someone came up at the end and…

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    24. Creating a Nation

    Prof: On Thursday, I gave the world’s most condensed lecture about the Constitution, and I mentioned three controversies that represented long-standing concerns in Revolutionary America: the question of representation, the problem of slavery, and then the question of a national executive– so that really boils down to the problem of investing power in one man. Now I did manage to discuss all three of those things briefly before the end of the lecture. I did not have time to discuss one last issue, which I do want to talk about here before I go into the real topic of today’s lecture. I just ran out of time. And it actually…