• President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES
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    President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, president vs. congress, does the separation of powers still work? John Charles Daly: Nearly 200 years ago, our founding fathers in the Federalist argued that the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. The preservation of liberty requires that the three great departments of…

  • Mises Weekends Live! Allen Mendenhall on our Terrible Supreme Court
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    Mises Weekends Live! Allen Mendenhall on our Terrible Supreme Court

    This is Mises Weekends with your host Jeff Deist. (Loud and enthusiastic applause) That was, that was pretty well trained. That was like, that was like a sitcom audience right there. But, anyway. It is the weekend of our Supporter Summit and as you can see, we’re filming Mises weekends live. Our topic this week is the Supreme Court. We just couldn’t avoid it with everything that’s been going on with Kavanaugh and this really horrible politicization of everything we’ve seen. So, our guest is a friend of mine Allen Mendenhall. Some of you have seen him on the show before talking about recent Supreme Court nominees. He’s an Associate…

  • Congressional Delegation: Crash Course Government and Politics #13
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    Congressional Delegation: Crash Course Government and Politics #13

    This episode of Crash Course is brought to you by Squarespace. Hi I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re going to cross the streams of the legislative and executive branches and talk about delegation. I thought we weren’t supposed to cross the streams Stan?! Ooh, that’s Ghostbusting. Sorry about that. We’re far away from the text of the Constitution here, deep in the realm of informal powers. But basically, delegation explains why the President is so powerful, even though the Consitution and its framers were terrified of creating a Presidentzilla. (Squeaky dinosaur noise) [Theme Music] So, what exactly is delegation? First of all, to…

  • The Legislative Branch at the Federal Level
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    The Legislative Branch at the Federal Level

    Today we will learn about the Legislative Branch at the Federal level. Federal means National or for the whole country, so the Legislative Branch at the Federal level makes laws for the whole country. The Legislative Branch is one of the three branches of government, and we often call the Legislative Branch “Congress” Congress is made of two Houses, the House of Representatives and the Senate. Members of the Congress are elected every two years in November, in what we call General Elections. Meetings in Congress are called session and each session begins in January 3rd. Each member of Congress is paid an annual salary of 174,000 dollars, has a…

  • Article 1: The Legislative Branch
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    Article 1: The Legislative Branch

    Today we will learn about Article 1 of the Constitution. Article 1 goes over the Legislative Branch or in other words Congress. The Legislative Branch’s job is to write laws, and it is divided into two houses to get that job done. The House of Representatives who meet on this side of the Capital building and the Senate who meet over here on this side. The House of Representatives and the Senate, each write laws, but they have a few key differences. According to Article 1, members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years, must be at least 25 years old, and have been a citizen of…