• Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
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    Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] Hey, this is Kim from Khan Academy, and today I’m learning about Article I of the U.S. Constitution. Article I is jam packed with information about how our government is supposed to work, but principally what it does is create the Legislative Branch of government, which includes the House of Representatives, and the Senate, which together, comprise the Congress of the United States. Article I also tells us how people can get elected to those bodies, and what powers Congress has. To learn more about Article I, I talked to two Constitutional experts. Ilya Somin is a professor of law at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George…

  • The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What I want you to do in this video is a little bit more of a deep dive into the House of Representatives. Now we’ve already talked about how either chamber of Congress can introduce general legislation. And if it gets approved by one chamber, it has to be voted on and approved by the other chamber. But the House of Representatives has some specific constitutional powers. So for example, impeachment proceedings would start in the House of Representatives. In other videos we have talked about impeachment is not the removal from office, of say the president, it is just a formal indictment. Now if the House of…

  • 📜 Learn English Words – BILL OF RIGHTS – Meaning, Vocabulary Lesson with Pictures and Examples
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    📜 Learn English Words – BILL OF RIGHTS – Meaning, Vocabulary Lesson with Pictures and Examples

    Bill of Rights the first ten amendments of the Constitution that guarantee the rights of the people of the United States The Bill of Rights was added to the U.S. Constitution to insure certain freedoms and rights to the citizens of America. As the first ten changes, the Bill of Rights was written by founding father James Madison to improve the original document. The first amendment of the Bill of Rights protects an American’s right to freedom of religion. Because of the fifth amendment found in the Bill of Rights, the U.S. Constitution protects citizens from having to testify against themselves in court. In 1789, twelve changes were proposed, but…

  • United States v.  Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    United States v. Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What we’re going to do in this video is talk about a relatively recent U.S. Supreme Court case, and this is the United States versus Lopez, and the decision was made in 1995. And this is significant because many of the cases we have talked about are things that broadened the power of the federal government. While the decision in United States versus Lopez, which was a split decision, it was a five-to-four decision, put some limits on federal power. And so just to understand what happened. In 1990, the U.S. Congress passes the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990. And it says, “It shall be unlawful for…

  • The Preamble to the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
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    The Preamble to the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy

    – [Sal] Hello, everyone, this is Sal here, and I’m here with Jeffrey Rosen who’s head of the National Constitution Center. What are we going to talk about today, Jeff? – [Jeff] We’re going to talk about the Preamble to the US Constitution. – [Sal] That sounds very important. – [Jeff] It is very important. The entire theory of popular sovereignty is contained within these beautiful words, so we’ve got a lot to talk about. – [Sal] And before we even get into it, what do you mean by the theory of popular sovereignty? – [Jeff] So the preamble begins with the famous words, ‘We the people of the United…

  • Democratic ideals of US government
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    Democratic ideals of US government

    – [Instructor] What we’re gonna do in this video is discuss some of the foundational ideas for the United States of America. And we could start at the most foundational of ideas and that’s the notion of natural rights. John Locke, one of the significant Enlightenment thinkers describes rights like life, liberty and you might expect me to say pursuit of happiness, which is what we see in the Declaration of Independence, but John Locke refers to life, liberty and property. But even though his version is a little bit different than what ends up in the Declaration of Independence, most historians believe that Thomas Jefferson was heavily influenced by…

  • Federalist No. 10 (part 2) | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Federalist No. 10 (part 2) | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] In the part one video, we already saw James Madison and Federalist number 10. argue strongly that a republican form of government is better for addressing the issues of having an majority faction that might try to overrun minority groups. In this video, we’re going to continue to see that argument that not only is a republic better, but if you’re going to have a republic, it’s better to have a large republic. In the next place, as each representative will be chosen by a greater number of citizens in the large, the large republic, than in the small republic. It will be more difficult for unworthy candidates…

  • The impact of constitutional compromises on us today | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The impact of constitutional compromises on us today | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] When you first learn about the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and the debates and the compromises, it’s easy to assume that, okay, that’s interesting from a historical point of view, but how does it affect me today? Well the simple answer is, it affects you incredibly, those compromises that were made over 200 years ago. So the most obvious question is, well what were those compromises? Well, to even start to appreciate the compromises, let’s start with this picture, or this chart, of the census in 1790, so it gives a pretty good snapshot of what the United States looked like after the Constitution was ratified. So, as…

  • Expansion of presidential power | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Expansion of presidential power | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What we’re going to talk about in this video is the expansion of presidential power. We’ve already seen that the Constitution talks about the different powers that a president would have. But as we’ve gone forward in history, the Constitution hasn’t imagined every circumstance that the president might face, and so there have been times when the presidents have used powers that aren’t explicitly given in the Constitution. For example, as early as 1803, you have the Louisiana Purchase, where you have Thomas Jefferson buying land from Napoleon’s France. It does not say explicitly anywhere in the Constitution that presidents are allowed to buy land from foreign countries.…