• Universal News Tonight: Library Special | 2019 CSLP-TVC | New York (NY)
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    Universal News Tonight: Library Special | 2019 CSLP-TVC | New York (NY)

    Welcome to Universal News Tonight We’re your hosts, Baxter Booksworth And I’m Nova Series Breaking News: readers protest the new technology that could signal the end of paper-bound books W-wait people still like books? Anyways, let’s go to weather As you can see, the rest of the week is expected to be good weather throughout the entire galaxy There is a chance of Jupiter’s moons experiencing some meteor showers tonight into tomorrow So, please guys, stay safe out there Now, to Jack Orion with Sports Welcome Back Tonight’s top story is library usage in up across the universe They are more than just books With all the services and programs…

  • MOOC | Slavery and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1861 | 1.2.7
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    MOOC | Slavery and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1861 | 1.2.7

    >>The Constitution embeds slavery or slavery is embedded in the Constitution, even though the word “slave” or “slavery” is not in the Constitution until the 13th Amendment — which is ratified after the Civil War — which abolishes slavery irrevocably. That is the first time the word “slavery” appears in the Constitution. The founders were — I don’t know, they just didn’t want to put the word “slavery” in. So they used circumlocutions, “persons held to labor,” this kind of thing. But everyone knew what they were talking about. Here just we will talk about this as we go along because the Constitution’s relation to slavery is a key point…

  • MOOC | Confederate Women | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.6
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    MOOC | Confederate Women | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.6

    >>And then we come to another issue, which is what McCurry talks about in a very innovative and, you know, an important book, which is the role of women in the Confederacy. White women. And here, let us go back to, here is, wait, let’s find this. Here’s a very famous painting, called “The Burial of Latane.” It’s from right after the war. It’s a scene on a Southern plantation. Well, actually, burial. It’s a funeral. Can you see this? What’s going on here? What do we see in “The Burial of Latane” that’s interesting? Who is the only man present?>>Black.>>Right. A black man. The plantation, it’s all under the…

  • MOOC | Confederate Politics | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.3
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    MOOC | Confederate Politics | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.3

    >>Anyway, the president of the Confederacy, of course, was Jefferson Davis, the former senator from (there he is) former senator from Mississippi, former secretary of war. A radical, but not a total fire- eater, as the South Carolinians had been called. His vice president was Alexander Stephens from Georgia, who had no connection with him whatsoever. Davis had been a Democrat before the war. Stephens had been a Whig, until the Whig Party collapsed. Stephens opposed secession, but then went along with it when it was voted in in Georgia. They didn’t know each other. They had no personal rapport and basically couldn’t get along at all. They had taken…

  • MOOC | Confederate Finances | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.4
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    MOOC | Confederate Finances | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.4

    >>The trouble with this argument of our great scholar McKitrick, again, is that it purely is a political argument. In other words, it argues that a flaw in the political structure of the South is the real problem. But another way of looking at it is the organization of Southern society itself generated policies which were counterproductive, and also created irreconcilable opposition, which a different political structure might not have been able to deal with anyway. Planter control determined how the war would be waged. Start at the very basic, with money, right? How do you finance? A war requires a lot of money, far more money than the federal…

  • MOOC | The Confederate Nation | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.2
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    MOOC | The Confederate Nation | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | 2.5.2

    >>Well, the Confederacy, the Confederate States of America, as a new nation, proclaimed itself in early 1861. They adopted a constitution in February 1861. The Confederate Constitution was largely modeled on the U.S. Constitution with such changes as were thought to be necessary to protect, further protect, slavery. It had some kind of quirky changes. One was that the president served for a six-year term and was not re-electable. The president of the Confederacy was elected for a six-year term and that was it. Now, this is a plan, this is an idea which has been put forward many times over the past hundred years by so-called reformers, political reformers,…

  • MOOC | Reconstruction and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.3.2
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    MOOC | Reconstruction and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.3.2

    >>So as I say, there was this political basis for his racism, that he thought that the black vote, if it came about, would simply be manipulated by the planters to the detriment of the yeoman farming whites. That alliance would rule the South and it would be just like before the Civil War. He somehow saw slavery as an alliance of planters and slaves from which the yeoman and the poorer whites suffered. Well, the problem…that is true, it’s all true, but the fact is that Johnson quickly changed his mind, you’ll see in a minute. Within a few months he was allying himself with the planters. His effort…

  • Webinar – Protecting Patron Privacy in Public Libraries – 2017-03-16
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    Webinar – Protecting Patron Privacy in Public Libraries – 2017-03-16

    Crystal: Welcome and thank you for joining us for today’s TechSoup for Library’s webinar. Today’s topic is protecting patron privacy in public libraries. My name is Crystal, and I’ll be your host. Patron privacy is of critical importance to libraries. It’s included in the American Library Association’s Code of Ethics and the Library Bill of Rights. As technology changes rapidly, libraries and librarians are working hard to keep up with digital security issues to better protect the privacy of their users, but this is not an easy task. Today we have two guests joining us to help us sort out some of these issues and share examples of solutions. We…

  • MOOC | The Lecompton Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1861 | 1.7.6
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    MOOC | The Lecompton Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1861 | 1.7.6

    >>The political geography in Kansas is utterly confusing. They have election after election. Some of them the pro slavery people vote. Some of them the others vote. But the real battle is going on in Congress. The administration 1858 decides we’re going to push this through Congress. We’re going to admit Kansas as a slave state under this Lecompton Constitution which has been approved by the voters in a referendum which the Free State people did not take part in. They said it’s an illegitimate referendum. It’s being put forward by an illegitimate body and we are not voting in this referendum. Northern democrats were put in a tremendous dilemma…