• How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone
    Articles,  Blog

    How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone

    There’s a job out there with a great deal of power, pay, prestige, and near-perfect job security. And there’s only one way to be hired: get appointed to the US Supreme Court. If you want to become a justice on the Supreme Court, the highest federal court in the United States, three things have to happen. You have to be nominated by the president of the United States, your nomination needs to be approved by the Senate, and finally, the president must formally appoint you to the court. Because the Constitution doesn’t specify any qualifications, in other words, that there’s no age, education, profession, or even native-born citizenship requirement, a…

  • You Have the Right to Remain Silent – California Bill Strengthens Miranda for Kids
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    You Have the Right to Remain Silent – California Bill Strengthens Miranda for Kids

    How you doing sir? Good how are you? Good good. Miranda rights were written to protect key constitutional rights. The right against self-incrimination, the right to an attorney You have the right to remain silent. But when a person doesn’t understand those rights, the rights have no meaning. Nowhere is this more evident than with children and youth in the custody of law enforcement. Do you understand? Yes. He has a big heart. He was a sweet little boy, that said he would grow up to be a police officer one day. As far as I knew, my son was at school. So when I get a call from the…

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    Getting a Handle on the Bill of Rights – Part 2

    Last time… on Knowing Better… So I decided to spend this weekend making him a life preserver, since I’ll be working with my hands I figured I’d help you learn the Bill of Rights by using your hands as well. Now to the third amendment, stick with me this one gets a little weird. Where is the detonator? Then I’ll sew these up and add some snaps and stuff to it, and you’ll get to see it in action next week when I finish the bill of rights. So last week we got through the first four amendments of the bill of rights. To recap, the first amendment has five…

  • Judicial Review: Crash Course Government and Politics #21
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    Judicial Review: Crash Course Government and Politics #21

    Hi. I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to talk about the most important case the Supreme Court ever decided ever. No, Stan, not Youngstown Sheet and Tube Company vs. Sawyer. Although, that is one of my favorites. Loves me some sheet and tube. And no, it’s not Ex parte Quirin. Although I do love me some inept Nazi spies and submarines. And no, it is not Miller v. California. Get your mind out of the gutter Stan. We could play this game all day, but this episode is about judicial review: the most important power of the Supreme Court and where it…

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    Due Process of Law: Crash Course Government and Politics #28

    Hi I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to try to define one of the trickiest terms in government and in the Constitution, and that is certiorari. No, we’ve already defined that. Due process of law. On the most basic level, due process is what it means to have a fair trial, but, as we’ll see, it’s a lot more than what goes on in the courtroom. Due process can refer to any type of legal action, but we’re mostly concerned with criminal procedure here, mainly because it’s always the government that brings criminal charges. Last time, we looked at search warrants and…