• Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
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    Article I of the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] Hey, this is Kim from Khan Academy, and today I’m learning about Article I of the U.S. Constitution. Article I is jam packed with information about how our government is supposed to work, but principally what it does is create the Legislative Branch of government, which includes the House of Representatives, and the Senate, which together, comprise the Congress of the United States. Article I also tells us how people can get elected to those bodies, and what powers Congress has. To learn more about Article I, I talked to two Constitutional experts. Ilya Somin is a professor of law at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George…

  • The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What I want you to do in this video is a little bit more of a deep dive into the House of Representatives. Now we’ve already talked about how either chamber of Congress can introduce general legislation. And if it gets approved by one chamber, it has to be voted on and approved by the other chamber. But the House of Representatives has some specific constitutional powers. So for example, impeachment proceedings would start in the House of Representatives. In other videos we have talked about impeachment is not the removal from office, of say the president, it is just a formal indictment. Now if the House of…

  • United States v.  Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    United States v. Lopez | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] What we’re going to do in this video is talk about a relatively recent U.S. Supreme Court case, and this is the United States versus Lopez, and the decision was made in 1995. And this is significant because many of the cases we have talked about are things that broadened the power of the federal government. While the decision in United States versus Lopez, which was a split decision, it was a five-to-four decision, put some limits on federal power. And so just to understand what happened. In 1990, the U.S. Congress passes the Gun-Free School Zones Act of 1990. And it says, “It shall be unlawful for…

  • The Seventh Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The Seventh Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy. Today we’re learning more about the Seventh Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Seventh Amendment guarantees the right to juries in civil cases, when the value in controversy is greater than $20. To learn more about the Seventh Amendment, I talked with two experts. Renee Lerner is the Donald Philip Rothschild Research Professor of Law at George Washington University Law School. She specializes in U.S. and English legal history, and she’s written extensively about the history of American juries. Suja Thomas is the Peer and Sarah Pederson Professor of Law at the Illinois College of Law. Her research interests include jury…

  • The Preamble to the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy
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    The Preamble to the Constitution | US Government and Politics | Khan Academy

    – [Sal] Hello, everyone, this is Sal here, and I’m here with Jeffrey Rosen who’s head of the National Constitution Center. What are we going to talk about today, Jeff? – [Jeff] We’re going to talk about the Preamble to the US Constitution. – [Sal] That sounds very important. – [Jeff] It is very important. The entire theory of popular sovereignty is contained within these beautiful words, so we’ve got a lot to talk about. – [Sal] And before we even get into it, what do you mean by the theory of popular sovereignty? – [Jeff] So the preamble begins with the famous words, ‘We the people of the United…

  • Democratic ideals of US government
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    Democratic ideals of US government

    – [Instructor] What we’re gonna do in this video is discuss some of the foundational ideas for the United States of America. And we could start at the most foundational of ideas and that’s the notion of natural rights. John Locke, one of the significant Enlightenment thinkers describes rights like life, liberty and you might expect me to say pursuit of happiness, which is what we see in the Declaration of Independence, but John Locke refers to life, liberty and property. But even though his version is a little bit different than what ends up in the Declaration of Independence, most historians believe that Thomas Jefferson was heavily influenced by…

  • The Third Amendment | The National Constitution Center | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The Third Amendment | The National Constitution Center | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy and today, I’m learning more about the Third Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which states that no soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. This amendment clearly draws its inspiration from the Quartering Acts that caused a great deal of tension between the American colonies and Great Britain leading up to the American Revolution. But does it have any relevance to our lives today? To learn more, I sought out the help of two experts. Jay Wexler…

  • Unadopted amendments to the Bill of Rights | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Unadopted amendments to the Bill of Rights | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy. Did you know that what we call the First Amendment today was actually the third amendment in the original draft of the Bill of Rights? In fact, there were more than 200 proposed amendments which were whittled down to just 12. That’s right, 12, not 10. So what were those two proposed amendments that weren’t ratified along with the other 10? The unadopted amendments. To learn more, I talked to Fergus Bordewich. He’s a writer and a historian, and the author of The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government. These unadopted…

  • Federalist No. 10 (part 2) | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Federalist No. 10 (part 2) | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] In the part one video, we already saw James Madison and Federalist number 10. argue strongly that a republican form of government is better for addressing the issues of having an majority faction that might try to overrun minority groups. In this video, we’re going to continue to see that argument that not only is a republic better, but if you’re going to have a republic, it’s better to have a large republic. In the next place, as each representative will be chosen by a greater number of citizens in the large, the large republic, than in the small republic. It will be more difficult for unworthy candidates…