• EDC Conference // Douglas NeJaime, “The Constitution of Parenthood”
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    EDC Conference // Douglas NeJaime, “The Constitution of Parenthood”

    David Velleman: Our next speaker is Douglas NeJaime. Did I get that right? Douglas NeJaime: Perfect. Velleman: Wonderful. He is the Anne Urowsky Professor of Law at Yale Law School where he teaches in the areas of family law, legal ethics, law and sexuality, and constitutional law. He was formerly at UCLA where he was the faculty leader of the… NeJaime: Williams. Velleman: Williams Institute on LGBT law. Yes? And his title is [pause]. NeJaime: The Constitution of Parenthood. Velleman: The Constitution of Parenthood! Sorry, making you do your own introduction. [Audience Applause] Thanks, so thanks to David for inviting me and thanks to Amy for organizing my participation. So…

  • ZOMBIELAND: Is It Deep or Dumb? – Wisecrack Edition
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    ZOMBIELAND: Is It Deep or Dumb? – Wisecrack Edition

    Hey Wisecrack, Helen here. When you spend as much time thinking about movies as we do, sometimes you wonder if you’re just plain overthinking. Is You Got Mail a fun-loving rom-com or an Orwellian masterpiece? Is Hairspray a metaphor for the Cold War? And what’s the super secret meaning at the heart of The Sandlot? This is all to say — sometimes when you read a text too deeply, you go a bit cross-eyed. Which brings us to Zombieland, which we’ve probably watched dozens of times at this point. On the surface, the film seems like a pretty typical mainstream horror-comedy, leaning more on quippy one-liners than on plot or…

  • Episode 121: How Well Does the Constitution Protect Liberty? (with Sheldon Richman)
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    Episode 121: How Well Does the Constitution Protect Liberty? (with Sheldon Richman)

    Aaron Ross Powell: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Ross Powell: And our guest today is Sheldon Richman. He’s the keeper of the blog Free Association at SheldonRichman.com, Senior Fellow at the Center for a Stateless Society and Contributing Editor at Antiwar.com. He’s also the author of three books – Separating School and State, Your Money or Your Life and Tethered Citizens and the forthcoming volume The Constitution Revisited. Today we’re going to be talking about a couple of posts that you had up at your Free Association blog on – one is called The Constitution Revisited.…

  • Free Thoughts, Ep. 261: Emerging Tech (with Matthew Feeney)
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    Free Thoughts, Ep. 261: Emerging Tech (with Matthew Feeney)

    [Music] welcome to free thoughts I’m Aaron Powell and I’m Paul Mitsuko filling in for Trevor Burrus I am host of libertarianism.org x’ newest podcast building tomorrow joining us today is Matthew Feeney he is director of the Cato Institute’s new project on emerging technology welcome back to free thoughts Matthew thank you for having me what is the project on emerging technology yeah the project on emerging technologies is Cato’s relatively new new endeavor so it’s I trying to count now I think it began a couple months ago June or July I should probably know that but it’s a relatively new I’m running it it’s a project of…

  • A Conversation About Research Ethics
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    A Conversation About Research Ethics

    Hi my name is James Arvanitakis. I’m the Dean of the Graduate Research School here at Western Sydney University. Welcome to our videos on ethical research. In this Part 1 we look at ethics as a process and some of the philosophical approaches you need to take. My name is Dr Tinashe Dune and i’m a lecturer in interprofessional health sciences and my research focuses on cultural diversity, marginalization and sexual and reproductive health, so the intersections between all of those things put together and how that influences health outcomes for people across Australia and across the world. So my research area is genetics and molecular biology and I do…

  • Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34
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    Natural Law Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #34

    Thomas Aquinas was no dummy. Remember him? The Italian fella? Christian monk? Philosophical superstar of the 13th century? Aquinas thought morality was important for everyone, and that being a good person was a vital part of God’s plan for each of us. But he knew that not everyone had been exposed to the Bible, or had even heard of God. So, what bothered him was: How could people follow God’s moral rules – also known as the divine commands – if they didn’t even know about the guy who made the commandments? Aquinas just couldn’t believe that God would have expectations for us, if he didn’t also give us –…

  • Articles

    Constitutional Ideology – the philosophy behind it

    Hey, Cypher here. So, I’m sure you guys have heard someone spouting off about what the founding fathers intended or whatever kind of rhetoric you want. Now, guessing anyone’s future intent about 200-some-odd years after that supposed intent is foolish enough, but let’s divest the squabble entirely. Today, I’m going to show you that the founders did not come up the declaration or constitution in an ideological vacuum, and in many ways implemented the ideas of others from a century before them. The glory for the idea ought to go to the philosophers. It’s fairly easy to see the Roman influence on the constitution. Look around DC and you’ll see…

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    Does the NSA Violate Your Constitutional Rights? | Learn Liberty

    Many people don’t know what their constitutional freedoms are or why they have them in the first place. They’ve gotten so used to the freedoms they’ve enjoyed as Americans that they haven’t noticed just how rare and fragile they really are. Before America’s founding, the British king George III would issue what were called general warrants, which empowered local authorities to look for wrongdoing anywhere and to use their discretion to find any kind of treasonous behavior, including among the people that would come to be our Founders. But this became such an abuse of dictatorial authority that after the Revolutionary War a prohibition on general warrants was written right…

  • Episode 111: Building a Better Government (with Richard A. Epstein)
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    Episode 111: Building a Better Government (with Richard A. Epstein)

    Trevor Burrus: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Ross Powell: And I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: Joining us today is Richard Epstein, the Lawrence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law and the Director of the Classical Liberal Institute. He is the author of many important books including Takings: Private Property and the Power of Eminent Domain and Simple Rules for a Complex World. His most recent book is The Classical Liberal Constitution. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Richard. Richard Epstein: It’s great to be here. Trevor Burrus: I would like to start with a broad question. There are many…

  • Episode 139: The Philosophical Foundations of the Constitution (with Roger Pilon)
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    Episode 139: The Philosophical Foundations of the Constitution (with Roger Pilon)

    Aaron Powell: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute, I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: And I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Powell: Joining us today is our colleague Roger Pilon, he’s the Vice President for Legal Affairs and founding director of the Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Roger. Roger Pilon: Thank you, good to be with you. Aaron Powell: The First Amendment reads, in part, “Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech.” So we’ve got those words written down, how do we know what they mean? Roger Pilon: We look at the text as a start and if that…