• Episode 121: How Well Does the Constitution Protect Liberty? (with Sheldon Richman)
    Articles,  Blog

    Episode 121: How Well Does the Constitution Protect Liberty? (with Sheldon Richman)

    Aaron Ross Powell: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Ross Powell: And our guest today is Sheldon Richman. He’s the keeper of the blog Free Association at SheldonRichman.com, Senior Fellow at the Center for a Stateless Society and Contributing Editor at Antiwar.com. He’s also the author of three books – Separating School and State, Your Money or Your Life and Tethered Citizens and the forthcoming volume The Constitution Revisited. Today we’re going to be talking about a couple of posts that you had up at your Free Association blog on – one is called The Constitution Revisited.…

  • Free Thoughts, Ep. 261: Emerging Tech (with Matthew Feeney)
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    Free Thoughts, Ep. 261: Emerging Tech (with Matthew Feeney)

    [Music] welcome to free thoughts I’m Aaron Powell and I’m Paul Mitsuko filling in for Trevor Burrus I am host of libertarianism.org x’ newest podcast building tomorrow joining us today is Matthew Feeney he is director of the Cato Institute’s new project on emerging technology welcome back to free thoughts Matthew thank you for having me what is the project on emerging technology yeah the project on emerging technologies is Cato’s relatively new new endeavor so it’s I trying to count now I think it began a couple months ago June or July I should probably know that but it’s a relatively new I’m running it it’s a project of…

  • ConstitutionUK: Crowdsourcing the UK’s Constitution
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    ConstitutionUK: Crowdsourcing the UK’s Constitution

    Hello. Welcome to this website-LSE IPA’s Crowdsourcing the United Kingdom Constitution. The reason we are doing this is simple- the United Kingdom doesn’t have a Constitution. It has no formal rules and regulations governing how the place is run and we want to change that. We want to change it with your help. We’re not relying on teams of experts, we’re not relying on the usual Professors gathered in a room, determining what it should be and then declaring it and this or that, soon to be ignored by paper. We’re involving the British public in the question- “What should go in the Constitution?”. We’re starting with a public meeting…

  • Defending States’ Rights: Impossible (Almost) | Sotirios Barber
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    Defending States’ Rights: Impossible (Almost) | Sotirios Barber

    I want to thank Professor Bibby and Thomas Hone for their work in putting this conference together and inviting me to this really beautiful state and this exciting University. Also the students who have helped to shuttle us around: Aaron, Top, and Jeremy. The subject of the conference is federalism and I’m going to be talking about states rights federalism. I’ll keep my comments brief because I’m anxious to hear what the others have to say, especially what the Congressman has to say. If you’re dealing with a practical subject “walking the walk and talking the talk” are closely connected. You don’t want to talk the talk that can’t be…

  • Episode 111: Building a Better Government (with Richard A. Epstein)
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    Episode 111: Building a Better Government (with Richard A. Epstein)

    Trevor Burrus: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Ross Powell: And I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: Joining us today is Richard Epstein, the Lawrence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law and the Director of the Classical Liberal Institute. He is the author of many important books including Takings: Private Property and the Power of Eminent Domain and Simple Rules for a Complex World. His most recent book is The Classical Liberal Constitution. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Richard. Richard Epstein: It’s great to be here. Trevor Burrus: I would like to start with a broad question. There are many…

  • Episode 139: The Philosophical Foundations of the Constitution (with Roger Pilon)
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    Episode 139: The Philosophical Foundations of the Constitution (with Roger Pilon)

    Aaron Powell: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute, I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: And I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Powell: Joining us today is our colleague Roger Pilon, he’s the Vice President for Legal Affairs and founding director of the Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Roger. Roger Pilon: Thank you, good to be with you. Aaron Powell: The First Amendment reads, in part, “Congress shall make no law abridging the freedom of speech.” So we’ve got those words written down, how do we know what they mean? Roger Pilon: We look at the text as a start and if that…

  • Articles

    Episode 148: Liberty and Coercion: The Paradox of American Government (with Gary Gerstle)

    Trevor Burrus: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Trevor Burrus. Joining me today is Gary Gerstle, the Paul Mellon Professor of American History at the University of Cambridge and the author of the new book, Liberty and Coercion: The Paradox of American Government from the Founding to the Present. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Gary. Gary Gerstle: Thank you very much. Trevor Burrus: So, I would start with the interesting and provocative title of your book, Liberty and Coercion. Why did you choose those two concepts, which I guess are somewhat antithetical concepts, as your—for your overview of American history? Gary Gerstle: Well, for me, those…

  • Articles

    Episode 149: Our Republican Constitution (with Randy E. Barnett)

    Trevor Burrus: Welcome to Free Thoughts from Libertarianism.org and the Cato Institute. I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Ross Powell: And I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: Joining us today is Randy E. Barnett, the Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory at Georgetown University Law Center and the Director of the Georgetown Center for the Constitution and a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. He is the author of the new book Our Republican Constitution. Welcome to Free Thoughts. Randy Barnett: Thanks both of you for having me back. Trevor Burrus: So you and I were heavily involved in the Obamacare litigation, the first round of that and that’s how you opened up…

  • The American Presidential Election of 1800
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    The American Presidential Election of 1800

    Mr.. beat presents presidential elections in American history The fourth presidential election in American history was held from Friday October 31st to Wednesday December 3rd, 1800 It was a significant election. In fact some called the, “revolution of 1800” Due to the political realignment it created It was essentially a rematch between incumbent president John Adams and his off-and-on friend/enemy Vice President Thomas Jefferson In 1800 Adams and Jefferson were far from friends The two had spent the previous four years Awkwardly working side-by-side as president and vice president, but now they seemed to hate each other, their campaigns were just plain nasty Jefferson supporters said President Adams had a…

  • Free Thoughts, Ep. 204: Lessons from the Anti-Federalists (with William J. Watkins, Jr.)
    Articles,  Blog

    Free Thoughts, Ep. 204: Lessons from the Anti-Federalists (with William J. Watkins, Jr.)

    Trevor Burrus: Welcome to Free Thoughts. I’m Trevor Burrus. Aaron Powell: And I’m Aaron Powell. Trevor Burrus: Joining us today is William J. Watkins, Jr., Research Fellow at Independent Institute in California and Former Prosecutor and Defense Attorney who has practiced in various state and federal courts. He is the author of Crossroads for Liberty: Recovering the Anti-Federalist Values of America’s First Constitution. Welcome to Free Thoughts, Bill. William J. Watkins, Jr.: Guys, thank you for having [00:00:30] me. Great to be here. Trevor Burrus: The subtitle of your book says America’s First Constitution. I assume you’re referring to the Articles of Confederation? William J. Watkins, Jr.: That would be…