• As Last Confederate Statue Is Removed in New Orleans, Will School Names & Street Signs Follow?
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    As Last Confederate Statue Is Removed in New Orleans, Will School Names & Street Signs Follow?

    AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, the War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman. JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And I’m Juan González. Welcome to our all of our listeners and viewers around the country and around the world. We begin today’s show in New Orleans, where on Friday the city removed the last of four Confederate statues in recent weeks. Hundreds of people gathered to celebrate as the massive bronze statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee came down. It was the first of a series of monuments to be removed during daylight. Workers wore bulletproof vests and face coverings to conceal their identities as they used a crane to remove…

  • Party Systems: Crash Course Government and Politics #41
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    Party Systems: Crash Course Government and Politics #41

    Hello, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics. And today we’re gonna talk about, well, mostly history. Wait Stan, this isn’t Crash Course History. This must be some kind of exception, like the Mongols. [Mongoltage] Apparently we’re not stepping on anybody’s toes by talking about the history of American political parties, as long as we stay away from history in general. Thank goodness, we wouldn’t want to start a Crash Course interdisciplinary feud. Just kidding, I’m totally feuding with that Phil guy over at Astronomy. [Theme Music] Political historians like to divide America into eras according to which parties were active at the time. These are called…

  • MOOC | Reconstruction and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.3.2
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    MOOC | Reconstruction and the Constitution | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.3.2

    >>So as I say, there was this political basis for his racism, that he thought that the black vote, if it came about, would simply be manipulated by the planters to the detriment of the yeoman farming whites. That alliance would rule the South and it would be just like before the Civil War. He somehow saw slavery as an alliance of planters and slaves from which the yeoman and the poorer whites suffered. Well, the problem…that is true, it’s all true, but the fact is that Johnson quickly changed his mind, you’ll see in a minute. Within a few months he was allying himself with the planters. His effort…

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    Laura F. Edwards: “The Reconstruction of Rights after the Civil War”

    [ Church Bells ]>>Well good morning again and welcome back. I am Kathryn Schumaker. I’m an Assistant Professor of Classics and Letters, and I’m pleased that you could join us here today for the University of Oklahoma’s Teach-In focusing on the strength and fragility of constitutions. Thank you to Eric White, who’s out there somewhere, for that wonderful talk. And our second speaker today is Laura Edwards, the author of A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction: A Nation of Rights. She is also the author of The People and Their Peace: Legal Culture and the Transformation of Inequality in the Post-Revolutionary South, Scarlet Doesn’t Live Here Anymore:…

  • Reconstruction: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
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    Reconstruction: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

    The American Civil War ended in 1865. And a new conflict immediately began. The North won the first war. The South won the second. To truly understand American history, one needs to understand how this happened, and why. The years immediately following the end of the Civil War—1865 to 1877—are known in American history as “Reconstruction.” What should have been a glorious chapter in America’s story—the full integration of 3.9 million freed slaves—instead became a shameful one. It began with the assassination of Republican president Abraham Lincoln. One week after the Civil War effectively ended, the one man with the political savvy and shrewdness to have guided Reconstruction was gone.…

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    Reconstruction and 1876: Crash Course US History #22

    Episode 21: Reconstruction Hi, I’m John Green, this is Crash Course U.S. History and huzzah! The Civil War is over! The slaves are free! Huzzah! That one hit me in the head? It’s very dangerous, Crash Course. So when you say, “Don’t aim at a person,” that includes myself? The roller coaster only goes up from here, my friends. Huzzah! Mr. Green, Mr. Green, what about the epic failure of Reconstruction? Oh, right. Stupid Reconstruction always ruining everything intro So after the Civil War ended, the United States had to reintegrate both a formerly slave population and a formerly rebellious population back into the country, which is a challenge that…

  • MOOC | The Fourteenth Amendment | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.4.1
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    MOOC | The Fourteenth Amendment | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.4.1

    >>In the spring of 1866, as we saw, an impasse had developed between the Republican majority in Congress and President Andrew Johnson over Reconstruction. And the impasse sort of increased the desire of many Republicans to put into the Constitution their understanding of the consequences of the Civil War — beyond the abolition of slavery, which had already been put into the Constitution — and to make that settlement, you know, beyond the ups and downs of Congressional majorities. The Civil Rights Bill had been passed, but it could be repealed by the next Congress. A piece of legislation is not nearly as permanent as a Constitutional amendment. And all…

  • Kurt Lash: Reconstructing First Principles [NSS 2018]
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    Kurt Lash: Reconstructing First Principles [NSS 2018]

    Federalism, in one sense, was dramatically impacted by the Fourteenth Amendment by expanding the scope of the Bill of Rights and applying those rights against the states. But in another sense, federalism, the basic constitutional structure which declares that the federal government has only limited enumerated power, that principle was not changed by the Fourteenth Amendment. In fact, it was because the drafters and the ratifiers of the Fourteenth Amendment continued to embrace the principles of federalism and the idea of limited federal power that convinced them to pass an amendment in the first place. Some radical Republicans in 1866 insisted that no amendment was necessary at all. They had…

  • MOOC | Sections of the Fourteenth Amendment | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.4.2
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    MOOC | Sections of the Fourteenth Amendment | The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | 3.4.2

    >>Alright. Let’s move up to [Section] 4. “The validity of the public debt of the United States…shall not be questioned.” That’s very interesting. There’s no jurisprudence about this, but it became an issue last year when Congress, it seemed, was not going to what they call “increase the debt limit,” and the United States was going to default on its public debt if that didn’t happen. And there were some people who said President Obama can use this clause of the 14th Amendment to unilaterally increase the debt limit, because otherwise, the validity of the public debt will be compromised, and the Constitution forbids that. It didn’t come to that.…

  • 22. Constitutional Crisis and Impeachment of a President
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    22. Constitutional Crisis and Impeachment of a President

    Professor David Blight: I was in a meeting some months ago of the New York Historical Society’s Board of Trustees; august, wonderful group of people. That’s about thirty-five very rich New Yorkers and two token historians, and I’m one of the token historians. They have us there for window dressing, and other good and useful and noble purposes. And during a discussion of a subject I won’t even go into, one of the very intelligent and very dedicated members of that board–and I’m not being ironic–said that he really wished American history could be about “people of goodwill.” He wished American history wasn’t so full of conflict. In effect, he…