• President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES
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    President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, president vs. congress, does the separation of powers still work? John Charles Daly: Nearly 200 years ago, our founding fathers in the Federalist argued that the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. The preservation of liberty requires that the three great departments of…

  • Supreme Court Roundup: October Term 2018 [SCOTUSbrief]
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    Supreme Court Roundup: October Term 2018 [SCOTUSbrief]

    This was an interesting term. Not as many blockbusters, necessarily, as-as in past years, but plenty to chew on, and there are individual videos about the-the biggest cases. I want to talk about three others that might get overlooked. Knick was the biggest property rights case of the term, probably the biggest property rights case in some time. Even though it was a procedural case, that is, it was about whether you have to first go to state court to bring your claim that the local government has taken your property in violation of the Fifth Amendment, or whether you can go straight to federal court. Rose Mary Knick said…

  • The Convention of States Article V Application in 2 Minutes
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    The Convention of States Article V Application in 2 Minutes

    Article V of the United States Constitution gives We the People the power to put the federal government back in its constitutional box and expand liberty for all. Once two-thirds of the states pass similar applications, a Convention of States will be called and there is nothing the federal government can do to stop it. This isn’t a red movement or a blue movement. It’s an American movement based on one fundamental question: Who decides? Who should decide the issues that affect your community–Washington, D.C. or you? The Convention of States Action resolution applies for an Article V convention that would propose constitutional reforms limited to three topics. First, fiscal…

  • Department of Commerce v. New York [SCOTUSbrief]
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    Department of Commerce v. New York [SCOTUSbrief]

    The parties in this case, on one side we have the Department of Commerce, the Census Bureau, and Wilbur Ross, who’s the Secretary of Commerce. On the other side we have a group of states led by New York, several major cities and counties, and a couple of different nonprofits. This case has two different issues. The first issue, broadly, is whether the Constitution or any other law bars the US Secretary of Commerce from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census. And then the second question is whether the district court properly allowed the challengers in the case to seek discovery, additional fact-finding, beyond the official administrative…

  • The Principles of the Constitution
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    The Principles of the Constitution

    Welcome to the Principles of the Constitution a study guide. Let’s start by talking about just what a Constitution is. A Constitution is the rules for running our government. It’s also considered to be the supreme law of the land. No law can be written that goes against the Constitution. And if there’s ever a doubt about what laws should or should not be followed look to the Constitution because that is the top law of the land. Now there are seven principles discussed in the Constitution. Principles are the beliefs about the purpose and the running of our government. These are the purposes and beliefs of the people who…

  • The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8
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    The Constitution, the Articles, and Federalism: Crash Course US History #8

    Hi, I’m John Green, this is Crash Course U.S. History, and today we’re going to talk about the United States Constitution. And, in doing so, we’re going to explore how the American style of government became the envy of the entire world, so much so that everyone else copied us. What’s that, Stan? We’re not gonna talk about other countries stealing our form of government? Because no other country stole our form of government? That – that doesn’t seem possible, Stan. [Patriotic Rock Music] No, Stan, not the Libertage, cue the intro! [Theme Music] So, today we’re going to learn why the green areas of not-America didn’t copy us. All…