• Can Congress Sub-Delegate Legislative Powers? [No. 86]
    Articles,  Blog

    Can Congress Sub-Delegate Legislative Powers? [No. 86]

    The Constitution of the United States divides up powers of government among different institutions. It vests all legislative powers herein granted in Congress; it vests the executive power in the President and through the President and subordinates within administrative agencies. And it vests the judicial power of the United States in Federal Courts. Question is, what are the contours of that power? If Congress gives certain authority, to the President, to administrative agencies, to courts, for that matter, to private citizens or foreign countries, is there a point at which Congress is giving those other entities the legislative power that the Congress is vested with under The Constitution. That question,…

  • Should Courts Defer to Political Branches? [No. 86]
    Articles,  Blog

    Should Courts Defer to Political Branches? [No. 86]

    One popular notion about how to think about the courts is the idea of judicial restraint. The idea here is that when interpreting the Constitution, courts should be restrained and should defer to the judgments of Congress or the President or the state legislatures. I do not think that the courts should defer to the opinions of other branches about the meaning of the Constitution. But this is the way I think it should work is that the legislative branches or the political branches are entitled to govern, unless what they are doing violates the Constitution. And some things that they might do violate the very words, I mean, you…

  • Constitutional Principles
    Articles,  Blog

    Constitutional Principles

    Welcome back, Government students! In Unit 1 you learned about the foundations of American government. Where we came from and how we got started here in the United States. You also learned about our first real attempt at forming a government to unify the colonies— The Articles of Confederation… As you remember, that was a terrible failure. So now we have a brand new nation with a failing government and an outlook that seemed bleak. The Founding Fathers were in desperate need of a constitution—or established principles—to guide our nation and maintain order. It needed to unify the states and establish justice, maintain safety across the nation, provide for the…

  • What Is Impeachment?
    Articles,  Blog

    What Is Impeachment?

    I’m Micah Schwartzman I’m the director of the Karsh Center for Law and Democracy. which is a relatively new center at the law school and and I’m here to host this session on impeachment. We’re running a series like faculty student discussion series there’ll be three of these events this is the first of them and the question what is impeachment we’ll have a second session about a week from now and you should look for that there’s a poster outside and you’ll see I think in the email that’s gone around about this series the second one will be about the nature of of corruption and bribery and what…

  • Articles

    Obama Violates the Fundamental Doctrine of the Constitution

    On July 4th, 1776, a small band of patriots declared that we were a people created equal — free to think and worship and live as we please.  It was a declaration heard around the world — that we were no longer colonists, we were Americans, and our destiny would not be determined for us; it would be determined by us. It was a bold and tremendously brave thing to do.  It was also nearly unthinkable.  At that time, kings and princes and emperors ruled the world.  But those patriots were certain that a better way was possible.  And this tyrant has robbed us of that better way, structured in…

  • Court Shorts: Separation of Powers
    Articles,  Blog

    Court Shorts: Separation of Powers

    This concept of separation of powers is what makes America great. It is absolutely the genius of our democracy. Here we are over two centuries later and still the Constitution with its three pillars of government exists in the same form as it did at the founding. All of these parts working together creates a team effort, which really aids our form of government and creates its stability. Many people don’t realize that the Constitution sets out three branches of government. The first is the Legislative Branch. The second branch is the Executive Branch that we typically think of the president, but it also includes all of his executive officers.…

  • Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15
    Articles,  Blog

    Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government & Politics, and today, we’re gonna talk about bureaucracies, just as soon as I finish filling out these forms. Do I really have to initial here, here, and here on all three copies, Stan? Regulations say so? All right. I’m just kidding. I don’t really have to fill out forms in triplicate in order to make an episode of Crash Course, but this kind of stuff is one of the main reasons that people don’t like bureaucracies. Americans tend to associate them with incomprehensible rules and time-wasting procedures and probably most annoying – actual bureaucrats. But bureaucracies are a lot like…

  • The Conservative Plan To Amend The Constitution | AM Joy | MSNBC
    Articles,  Blog

    The Conservative Plan To Amend The Constitution | AM Joy | MSNBC

    >>>LAS VEGAS SHOOTING REIGNITING THE NATIONAL DEBATE ON GUNS AND NFL PROTESTS DIVIDING THE FREE SPEECH, THE FIRST AND SECOND AMENDMENTS HAVE BEEN AT THE CENTER OF HEATED PUBLIC DEBATE. ONE PERSON IS OFFERING A NEW CHANGE. SMASHING THE D.C. MONOPOLY, TOM COBURN MAKES HIS CASE FOR A CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION TO REMAKE THE CONSTITUTION IN THE IMAGE OF HIS CONSERVATIVE IDEALS. MORE SPECIFICALLY, SHRINKING THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND GIVING MORE POWER TO THE STATES. IF YOU THINK THAT SOUNDS FARFETCHED, THINK AGAIN. ACCORDING TO MY NEXT GUESTS, THEY MIGHT JUST PULL IT OFF. TOM COBURN JOINS ME NOW. WITH ME IS THERESA TOMLINSON, THE MAYOR OF COLUMBUS, GEORGIA. I’M GOING…

  • How the Constitution is Organized
    Articles,  Blog

    How the Constitution is Organized

    The Constitution is organized into three main parts; the Preamble, the Articles, and the Amendments. When it was written in 1787 it only took up several large pages, but the best way to think about its organization, is by comparing it to a book. The Preamble is like an introduction. The Articles are like chapters and the Amendments are like a glossary at the end of the book. The Constitution begins with the Preamble, which is like an Introduction to a book, because it tells us what the rest of the Constitution is going to be about. It states, “We the people of the United States in order to form…

  • President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES
    Articles,  Blog

    President vs. Congress: Does the separation of powers still work? (1980) | ARCHIVES

    Announcer: From the nation’s capital, the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research presents Public Policy Forums, a series of programs featuring the nation’s top authorities presenting their differing views on the vital issues which confront us. Today’s topic, president vs. congress, does the separation of powers still work? John Charles Daly: Nearly 200 years ago, our founding fathers in the Federalist argued that the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. The preservation of liberty requires that the three great departments of…