• United States | Wikipedia audio article
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    United States | Wikipedia audio article

    The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles (9.8 million km2), the United States is the world’s third- or fourth-largest country by total area and slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe’s 3.9 million square miles (10.1 million km2). With a population of over 325 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital’s federal district are…

  • FIRST AMENDMENT to the UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION – WikiVidi Documentary
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    FIRST AMENDMENT to the UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION – WikiVidi Documentary

    WikiVidi.com First Amendment to the United States Constitution The First Amendment to the United States Constitution prevents Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, prohibiting the free exercise of religion, or abridging the freedom of speech, the freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or to petition for a governmental redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was originally proposed to assuage Anti-Federalist opposition to Constitutional ratification. Initially, the First Amendment applied only to laws enacted by the Congress, and many of its provisions were interpreted…

  • Confederation Period | Wikipedia audio article
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    Confederation Period | Wikipedia audio article

    The Confederation Period was the era of United States history in the 1780s after the American Revolution and prior to the ratification of the United States Constitution. In 1781, the United States ratified the Articles of Confederation and prevailed in the Battle of Yorktown, the last major land battle between British and American forces in the American Revolutionary War. American independence was confirmed with the 1783 signing of the Treaty of Paris. The fledgling United States faced several challenges, many of which stemmed from the lack of a strong national government and unified political culture. The period ended in 1789 following the ratification of the United States Constitution, which established…

  • Elbridge Gerry, Founding Father who got a Bad Rap
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    Elbridge Gerry, Founding Father who got a Bad Rap

    I told you I did tell you about elder eldridge jury is just just for the fun of it let’s just take up a break from the hysteria over the news in the for the moment and go back in time Elbridge Gerry was an American revolutionary he he he was a big supporter of thomas jefferson in writing the the declaration independence East Side is one of the signers the Declaration of Independence he showed up with Janene supported arse you know our site as a waiter in the Revolutionary War obviously he showed up for the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 however he refused…

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    FDR’s 2nd Bill of Rights p1

    you know i mentioned the f_d_r_ second all rights and tom barking basically blew it off and you know we kinda got into a discussion of but i mean the main mind you showed his candidate for governor are candidacy and his is platform i believe that franklin roosevelt second bill of rights actually really important and needs to be added to the constitution etc even liked all right is something that government has to put into place legislation to either protect or implement and if you have if you have a right to a job then congress has to pass legislation that says okay this person is not a…

  • Federalism in the United States | Wikipedia audio article
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    Federalism in the United States | Wikipedia audio article

    Federalism in the United States is the constitutional division of power between U.S. state governments and the federal government of the United States. Since the founding of the country, and particularly with the end of the American Civil War, power shifted away from the states and towards the national government. The progression of federalism includes dual, state-centered, and new federalism.==Federalism in the early Republic== Federalism was a political solution for the problems with the Articles of Confederation which gave little practical authority to the federal government. For example, the Articles allowed the Continental Congress the power to sign treaties and declare war, but it could not raise taxes to pay…

  • How Are State Supreme Court Justices Selected? [POLICYbrief]
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    How Are State Supreme Court Justices Selected? [POLICYbrief]

    State supreme court justices, uh interpret the Constitution, the statutes in their states, and then they also make the common law rules in their states. The purpose of the state supreme court is to be the final arbiter for all cases that are decided involving state law or state constitutions. Every state has at least one state supreme court, with the exception of Texas and Oklahoma, who have two. At the founding of our country, everyone used political appointment. The federal government did, and the states did. Some states used legislative, some states used gubernatorial appointment. In legislative appointment systems, the state legislature is responsible for appointing and re-appointing judges…

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    Advantages of Federalism, Part 3

    A third advantage of American federalism is that, because states retain policy-making autonomy, the system has allowed for a good deal of policy experimentation. As former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once famously put it, the states are “the laboratories of democracy.” Successful policy innovations in one state can be adopted by other states or by the national government. For example, major elements of the much-heralded Welfare Reform Act of 1996 such as time limits on benefits and work requirements began in several states, most notably Wisconsin, as waivers of national standards to determine whether state initiatives could lead to significant changes in welfare dependency patterns.

  • Bible Was Incorporated Into Constitution Through 7th Amendment
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    Bible Was Incorporated Into Constitution Through 7th Amendment

    we talked recently about David Barton who’s this american evangelical Christian minister and conservative activist the last time we talked about it was a few weeks ago we played a clip of him saying that a theocracy does not exist if there are elections in other words if you have a any any country where there are elections no matter how fraudulent or stage they are it is not a theocracy of course he seemed to be forgetting about places like Iran and Saudi Arabia and attic in etcetera anyway now he’s back in this is video from a a little class that he did where he explained how the…

  • Categorical grants, mandates, and the Commerce Clause | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Categorical grants, mandates, and the Commerce Clause | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] In a previous video, we’ve introduced ourselves to the idea of federalism in the United States. At a high level, you could view it as a contract between a national government and the states of which it is made, but you could also view it as a layered form of government where you have your local government and then layered on top of that your state government and then layered on top of that your national government, often referred to as the federal government. And we looked at the example of a layered cake but have said that over the course of American history, the layers have gotten…