• TEDxGreenville – Qiana Martin – Embrace the Universal Language of Soccer
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    TEDxGreenville – Qiana Martin – Embrace the Universal Language of Soccer

    Translator: Denise RQ Reviewer: Reiko Bovee “Can I get in?” It was not only a question that I posed to the sport of soccer. But one that I put forth to a group of West Indian and Latin American guys, in a Los Angeles park one day. I was a different gender, different ethnicity, and I grew up 3,000 miles away. So you can imagine the strange looks that they gave me! But, I had a ball. And that ball sealed the deal. I was a late arrival to the sport of soccer, but after that day in the park, I became consumed with the sport. I started to play…

  • Steven Schwaitzberg: A universal translator for surgeons
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    Steven Schwaitzberg: A universal translator for surgeons

    Translator: Timothy Covell Reviewer: Morton Bast So I want to talk to you about two things tonight. Number one: Teaching surgery and doing surgery is really hard. And second, that language is one of the most profound things that separate us all over the world. And in my little corner of the world, these two things are actually related, and I want to tell you how tonight. Now, nobody wants an operation. Who here has had surgery? Did you want it? Keep your hands up if you wanted an operation. Nobody wants an operation. In particular, nobody wants an operation with tools like these through large incisions that cause a…

  • Erica Frenkel: The universal anesthesia machine
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    Erica Frenkel: The universal anesthesia machine

    I’m going to talk to you today about the design of medical technology for low-resource settings. I study health systems in these countries. And one of the major gaps in care, almost across the board, is access to safe surgery. Now one of the major bottlenecks that we’ve found that’s sort of preventing both the access in the first place, and the safety of those surgeries that do happen, is anesthesia. And actually, it’s the model that we expect to work for delivering anesthesia in these environments. Here, we have a scene that you would find in any operating room across the US, or any other developed country. In the…

  • Are there universal expressions of emotion? – Sophie Zadeh
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    Are there universal expressions of emotion? – Sophie Zadeh

    The 40 or so muscles in the human face can be activated in different combinations to create thousands of expressions. But do these expressions look the same and communicate the same meaning around the world, regardless of culture? Is one person’s smile another’s grimace? Charles Darwin theorized that emotional expression was a common human feature. But he was in the minority. Until the mid-20th century, many researchers believed that the specific ways we show emotion were learned behaviors that varied across cultures. Personality theorist Silvan Tomkins was one of the few to insist otherwise. Tomkins claimed that certain affects— emotional states and their associated facial expressions— were universal. In the…

  • The emergence of universal consciousness: Brendan Hughes at TEDxPretoria
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    The emergence of universal consciousness: Brendan Hughes at TEDxPretoria

    Translator: Rhonda Jacobs Reviewer: Maria K. Good afternoon everybody. I’m going to speak on the emergence of universal consciousness. Now, admittedly, that’s a controversial topic. And it’s a controversial topic because so far universal consciousness has not been scientifically proven to be true. But this conception that things need to be scientifically proven in order for them to be true is itself false. And that’s neatly demonstrated each and every time scientists discover something new, something that we didn’t know before. Most recently, scientists are finding evidence for the Higgs boson. But if it’s true that it exists, then it means it’s existed for millions and millions of years, it’s…

  • The story behind the Boston Tea Party – Ben Labaree
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    The story behind the Boston Tea Party – Ben Labaree

    Translator: Andrea McDonough Reviewer: Bedirhan Cinar You’ve probably heard of the Boston Tea Party, something about a bunch of angry colonists dressed as Native Americans throwing chests of tea into the water. But the story is far more complicated, filled with imperial intrigue, corporate crisis, smuggling, and the grassroots origins of the American Revolution. The first thing you need to know about tea in the 1700’s is that it was really, really popular. In England, each man, woman, and child consumed almost 300 cups of this stuff every year. And, since the English colonized America, Americans were crazy about tea too. By the 1760’s, they were drinking over a million…

  • Dos caminos hacia la justicia educativa | Axel Rivas | TEDxRíodelaPlata
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    Dos caminos hacia la justicia educativa | Axel Rivas | TEDxRíodelaPlata

    Translator: Haydee Rodriguez Reviewer: Mariano Landini [Axel Rivas: Two ways to the educational justice] We live in very unfair societies and education may enlarge those injustices or combat them. That’s why today, I want to talk to two very powerful sectors. To the teachers, that they have the power in the classrooms and they are much more powerful than they think. And to the leading classes, to the politic and economic power that can change the education in our countries if they resolve to do it. And for that purpose I want to try to explain two great causes of educational inequalitites and two possible ways out: The distribution of…

  • Courage is Contagious: Jennifer Robinson at TEDxSydney
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    Courage is Contagious: Jennifer Robinson at TEDxSydney

    Translator: Meredith Law Reviewer: Peter van de Ven Not many lawyers would say that they feel inspired by the courage and the dedication of the people they represent. Fortunately, that is how I feel. Today, I want to tell you the story of someone who has inspired me. A person who I’ve acted for as a lawyer, but also as an advocate more broadly. Someone who’s become a friend. A person who has taken on powerful state and corporate interests with little more than an internet connection and a very committed group of volunteers. A person who has an uncompromising commitment to justice and has been the target of intense…

  • What did democracy really mean in Athens? – Melissa Schwartzberg
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    What did democracy really mean in Athens? – Melissa Schwartzberg

    Hey, congratulations! You’ve just won the lottery, only the prize isn’t cash or a luxury cruise. It’s a position in your country’s national legislature. And you aren’t the only lucky winner. All of your fellow lawmakers were chosen in the same way. This might strike you as a strange way to run a government, let alone a democracy. Elections are the epitome of democracy, right? Well, the ancient Athenians who coined the word had another view. In fact, elections only played a small role in Athenian democracy, with most offices filled by random lottery from a pool of citizen volunteers. Unlike the representative democracies common today, where voters elect leaders…

  • How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone
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    How do US Supreme Court justices get appointed? – Peter Paccone

    There’s a job out there with a great deal of power, pay, prestige, and near-perfect job security. And there’s only one way to be hired: get appointed to the US Supreme Court. If you want to become a justice on the Supreme Court, the highest federal court in the United States, three things have to happen. You have to be nominated by the president of the United States, your nomination needs to be approved by the Senate, and finally, the president must formally appoint you to the court. Because the Constitution doesn’t specify any qualifications, in other words, that there’s no age, education, profession, or even native-born citizenship requirement, a…