• Episode 3: Birth of the Constitution | History in a Nutshell
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    Episode 3: Birth of the Constitution | History in a Nutshell

    History In A Nutshell The year was 1783. The American Revolutionary War to gain independence from the grip of Great Britain, and King George III was over. The Treaty of Paris had been signed officially signaling the end of the Revolution. America was free at last, and it was time for the newly formed United States of America to create a permanent government of its own. That begs the question so we won the war… Now what? In order to understand how the Constitution came to be, It’s important to note the impacts of the previous documents leading up to its adoption: the Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of…

  • Becoming Equal Under the Law – Full Video
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    Becoming Equal Under the Law – Full Video

    “All men are created equal, endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights.” I think that’s one of the most important sentences in the English language. And then the next sentence of the Declaration says, “To secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” Jefferson set up a lofty ideal. All men are created equal. Their rights are inherent at birth, not given by a government. And government is set up to protect those rights. The genius of the American experiment is the notion that the same rules apply equally to all. But our country immediately fell short of Jefferson’s…

  • U.S.-India Constitutional Debate | Bengaluru Highlights
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    U.S.-India Constitutional Debate | Bengaluru Highlights

    Hi, I’m Advin Mohan from School of Law Christ University My name is Andel. I’m from School of Law Christ University My name is Sharlo Barona, and I’m a fifth-year law student from School of Law Christ University, Bangalore. Hi, I’m Nayagath Fathima. I’m from Christ University Hi, my name is Unuthi Niliya. I’m a fifth-year BA/LLB student at Anna Salu Bangalore. I heard about this debate for the first time because it’s being held by the literary and debating society here, and I think it’s an excellent opportunity. I’ve had a great day so far. This experience of India-U.S. Constitutional Debate has been quite brilliant because we’ve got a…

  • Georgetown Law Dean William Treanor Details Secret Changes to U.S. Constitution by Gouverneur Morris
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    Georgetown Law Dean William Treanor Details Secret Changes to U.S. Constitution by Gouverneur Morris

    “The Case of the Dishonest Scrivener: “Governeur Morris, the Creation “of the Federalist Constitution, and its Loss.” So first of all, that’s the dishonest scrivener, Governeur Morris, he’s seated on the left on this page. So what this is about is, at the very end of the Constitutional Convention, very end, they don’t have a Constitution. They have been debating for four months. They have a draft that is five weeks old, they have been arguing about it, voting things up, voting things down. Five committees, they don’t have a Constitution. And so they create a Committee of Style to bring it all together, and Style and Arrangement, supposed to…

  • Understanding the U.S. Constitution
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    Understanding the U.S. Constitution

    Today we are going to talk about the Constitution of the United States So what the Constitution is it covers the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments. And it also establishes our three branches of government. Bill of Rights. It was written to enumerate (list out), certain, but not all, of our personal and property rights. And it was written to restrict the power of Government. Bill of Rights are ten amendments to the U.S Constitution. The first Amendment, basically, this says that we have the freedom of speech. It says that we have the freedom to exercise or do any of the religion we want, freedom of the press,…

  • The Articles of Confederation
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    The Articles of Confederation

    THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION REPRESENTED THE ONLY WAY OF CREATING AN EFFECTIVE ALLIANCE AMONG THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS. THE AMERICAN PROVINCES HAD VERY LITTLE TO DO WITH EACH OTHER UNDER THE BRITISH EMPIRE. ONLY NEIGHBORS WOULD HAVE CERTAIN ARRANGEMENTS, OR COMMON POLICIES. BUT, BY AND LARGE, THE PRIMARY RELATIONSHIP WAS BETWEEN EACH PROVINCE AND BRITAIN. AND SO THE AMERICAN PROVINCES, WHICH HAD NO EXPERIENCE OF BEING INDEPENDENT POLITIES, OF GOVERNING THEMSELVES, IN FOREIGN POLICY, PARTICULARLY, SUDDENLY FACED A CHALLENGE, VERY MUCH LIKE THE CHALLENGE THAT A GROUP OF INDEPENDENT NATIONS WOULD FACE. THE FACT THAT THEY CONSTITUTED A CONGRESS, OR HAD A SERIES OF CONGRESSES, IS PRECISELY WHAT THE SAME WORD…

  • Would the Founding Fathers Impeach Trump? with Robert Reich
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    Would the Founding Fathers Impeach Trump? with Robert Reich

    Trump has asked a foreign power to dig up dirt on a major political rival. This is an impeachable offense. Come back in time with me. In late May 1787, when 55 delegates gathered in Philadelphia to begin debate over a new Constitution, everyone knew the first person to be president would be the man who presided over that gathering: George Washington. As Benjamin Franklin put it, “The first man put at the helm will be a good one,” but “Nobody knows what sort may come afterwards.” Initially, some of the delegates didn’t want to include impeachment in the Constitution, arguing that if a president was bad he’d be voted…

  • Lee Strang: The Declaration of Independence & the Constitution [NSS 2018]
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    Lee Strang: The Declaration of Independence & the Constitution [NSS 2018]

    Everybody agrees, I think, the Declaration of Independence is important because it’s a focal point of American constitutional and legal thought. Everybody says the Declaration is good and that we should follow it, but Americans disagree pretty deeply about what the Declaration of Independence means for us today. So, I’ve described the relationship between the Declaration and the Constitution where the Declaration is a piece of evidence that an interpreter should take into account to ascertain the Constitution’s original meaning. But it’s just that, a piece of evidence, and not one that’s privileged in some particular way. After the creation of the United States in 1776, the Declaration was infrequently…

  • Opinion | Trump’s impeachment would be a constitutional, not a political, question
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    Opinion | Trump’s impeachment would be a constitutional, not a political, question

    -Impeachment is a political question, though, not a legal one. -It is by design an inherently political process. -Impeachment is sort of the atomic bomb of political tools. -This has become the soundtrack of our age, that the decision to impeach is political, not legal, not moral, not constitutional. Don’t listen to this drumbeat. If you hear someone say impeachment is a political question, don’t buy it. The framers of the Constitution certainly didn’t. See, the Constitution is a legal document, and impeachment is a constitutional mechanism. Therefore, impeachment is a legal mechanism. It was designed by the framers to permit the republic to hold the president accountable for wrongdoing…