• Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40
    Articles,  Blog

    Political Parties: Crash Course Government and Politics #40

    Hi, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics and today we’re gonna talk about parties. Woo! Yeah! No, not those kind of parties. We’re talking about political parties, which can be a lot less fun. Woo. [Theme Music] So, today we’re talking about why we have political parties and the role of parties in American politics. But before we dive into the pool – some would say a cesspool – that is political parties, let’s have a definition. Political party: a team of politicians, activists and voters whose goal is to win control of government. So kind of an important point: the goal of a party is…

  • The Role of the Chief Justice [No. 86]
    Articles,  Blog

    The Role of the Chief Justice [No. 86]

    There was relatively little discussion about the role of the Chief Justice at the time of the framing, and the Constitution itself says relatively little about the Chief Justice. The only mention of a Chief Justice in the Constitution is in Article I, Section 3, which provides that when a President is impeached, the Chief Justice should supervise the trial. The Constitution really left to Congress, uh, the responsibility of specifying the powers of the Chief Justice and indeed of the Justices of the Supreme Court, uh, more generally, and many of the powers of the Chief Justice have evolved really as a matter of custom rather than as a…

  • Politics & Voting : How to Start a Petition to Get Legislation on a Ballot
    Articles,  Blog

    Politics & Voting : How to Start a Petition to Get Legislation on a Ballot

    “Hello this is Matthew Burbank”. Hello my name is Matthew Burbank and I’m an Associate Professor at the University of Utah and I’d like to talk to you a little bit about how to start a petition to get legislation on a ballot. The first thing you want to recognize is that this depends on the state that you live in. So in many states, you can indeed petition to have legislation considered directly by a vote. In other state, it’s not possible to do this. So the first thing that you need to know is if it’s possible in your state. Again, in some states it’s perfectly allowable to…

  • Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29
    Articles,  Blog

    Equal Protection: Crash Course Government and Politics #29

    Hi I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to finally get into why many people, including me, think that the Fourteenth Amendment is the most important part of the Constitution. At the same time, we will attempt – successfully, I hope – to unravel the difference between civil liberties and civil rights, and also try to figure out how the Supreme Court actually looks at civil rights and civil liberties cases. So that’s a lot. Let’s get this out of the way because we’re not gonna have time later. Let’s get started. [Theme Music] So we’ve been talking a lot in the past…

  • Articles

    Search and Seizure: Crash Course Government and Politics #27

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today, we’re gonna continue our discussion of the Bill of Rights, and talk about something that may actually be useful to you. We’re gonna talk about when the police are allowed to search your house, your car, and even you. But not me. I have immunity. I’m on YouTube. Right, is that how it works, Stan? It’s not how it works? I’m in trouble. You might think that this only matters if you are, you know, a criminal, and if you are, then you should be paying close attention, but even if you haven’t committed any crimes and…

  • Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23
    Articles,  Blog

    Civil Rights & Liberties: Crash Course Government #23

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re finally, at long last, moving on from the structures and branches of government and onto the structures and branches of trees. This is a nature show now. Okay, we’re not moving on completely, because we’re still talking about courts, but today we’ll be discussing actual court decisions, and the kind of things that courts rule on, rather than how they do it. That’s right, we’re moving onto civil rights and civil liberties. [Theme Music] Okay, first I want to talk about something that I find confusing: the difference between civil rights and civil liberties. Usually in…

  • Flipped Notes #5: Federalism
    Articles,  Blog

    Flipped Notes #5: Federalism

    Hello and welcome to Computer-Side Chat number five where we will be continuing our discussion on the US Constitution. So, we just wrapped up in class talking about the two major principles of separation of powers and checks and balances. What we’re talking about today will go hand-in-hand with those things. Our topic for today is ‘Federalism’. Now, before we jump into that, this is a good way to think about this. Separation of powers is government power being spread out horizontally or across a level of government. In other words, it’s splits up the federal level of government into three distinct branches or sections. It does the same thing…

  • Presidential Power: Crash Course Government and Politics #11
    Articles,  Blog

    Presidential Power: Crash Course Government and Politics #11

    This episode of Crash Course is brought to you by SquareSpace. Hi. I’m Craig and this is Crash Course: Government and Politics. And today, we’re gonna talk about the most powerful person in the U.S. No, not Chris Hemsworth, although he is powerful, in a physical sense. We’re talking about the President of the United States, who right now is Barack Obama But that’s the last we’ll mention of him specifically. Instead, we’ll examine the office of the Presidency and what makes whoever holds the office so powerful. We’re also gonna talk about what makes him (and so far the President has always been a him) less powerful than you…

  • Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5
    Articles,  Blog

    Constitutional Compromises: Crash Course Government and Politics #5

    Hi, I’m Craig, and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re going to talk about the single most important document in America, one that we’ll be talking about a lot over next few months. No, I’m not talking about O Magazine – it’s the United States Constitution, and what we’re really gonna focus on is how it got made and how it became the foundation of our government. [Theme Music] Those of you who watched the U.S. History series with John Green probably remember that the government set up by the Constitution is actually the second attempt at an American government. Also, as pointed out in the…

  • Freedom of the Press: Crash Course Government and Politics #26
    Articles,  Blog

    Freedom of the Press: Crash Course Government and Politics #26

    Hi, I’m Craig and this is Crash Course Government and Politics, and today we’re gonna finish up our discussion of the First Amendment, finally, by talking about everybody’s favorite: the press. The First Amendment is pretty clear that Congress can’t make any laws abridging the freedom of the press, and since you understand the basics of free speech because you were paying attention, the reasons for this should make a lot of sense. But as with any discussion of the First Amendment, things aren’t as straight forward as we might think, and the freedom of the press, just like the freedom of speech, is not absolute. [Theme Music] The main…