• The Seventh Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The Seventh Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy. Today we’re learning more about the Seventh Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Seventh Amendment guarantees the right to juries in civil cases, when the value in controversy is greater than $20. To learn more about the Seventh Amendment, I talked with two experts. Renee Lerner is the Donald Philip Rothschild Research Professor of Law at George Washington University Law School. She specializes in U.S. and English legal history, and she’s written extensively about the history of American juries. Suja Thomas is the Peer and Sarah Pederson Professor of Law at the Illinois College of Law. Her research interests include jury…

  • The Third Amendment | The National Constitution Center | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The Third Amendment | The National Constitution Center | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy and today, I’m learning more about the Third Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which states that no soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. This amendment clearly draws its inspiration from the Quartering Acts that caused a great deal of tension between the American colonies and Great Britain leading up to the American Revolution. But does it have any relevance to our lives today? To learn more, I sought out the help of two experts. Jay Wexler…

  • Unadopted amendments to the Bill of Rights | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Unadopted amendments to the Bill of Rights | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy. Did you know that what we call the First Amendment today was actually the third amendment in the original draft of the Bill of Rights? In fact, there were more than 200 proposed amendments which were whittled down to just 12. That’s right, 12, not 10. So what were those two proposed amendments that weren’t ratified along with the other 10? The unadopted amendments. To learn more, I talked to Fergus Bordewich. He’s a writer and a historian, and the author of The First Congress: How James Madison, George Washington, and a Group of Extraordinary Men Invented the Government. These unadopted…

  • The Ninth Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    The Ninth Amendment | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy. Today we’re learning more about the Ninth Amendment to the US Constitution, which reads, “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, “shall not be construed to deny or disparage “others retained by the people.” This, along with the Tenth Amendment, doesn’t protect a specific right, like freedom of religion or due process under the law, but rather, advances an interpretation of the scope of the Constitution and of government power. To learn more about the Ninth Amendment, I talked with two experts. Kurt Lash is the E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Chair in Law at the University of Richmond School of…

  • Foundations of American Democracy  –  Course Trailer
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    Foundations of American Democracy – Course Trailer

    – Welcome to foundations of American democracy. This is where it all begins. You might think it’s just about the United States. But here we’re going to go much deeper, and much further back than that. We’re gonna go to the original ideas. Deep dive into philosophy. What are the rights of the individual, and what rights are they willing to give up to a state, in order to have those individual rights protected. And this is something that humanity has struggled with for thousands and thousands of years. But over those thousands and thousands of years, as for the most part humanity was controlled by kings and emperors, little…

  • Categorical grants, mandates, and the Commerce Clause | US government and civics | Khan Academy
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    Categorical grants, mandates, and the Commerce Clause | US government and civics | Khan Academy

    – [Instructor] In a previous video, we’ve introduced ourselves to the idea of federalism in the United States. At a high level, you could view it as a contract between a national government and the states of which it is made, but you could also view it as a layered form of government where you have your local government and then layered on top of that your state government and then layered on top of that your national government, often referred to as the federal government. And we looked at the example of a layered cake but have said that over the course of American history, the layers have gotten…

  • Civil Rights and Civil Liberties – Course Trailer
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    Civil Rights and Civil Liberties – Course Trailer

    – The United States’ Declaration of Independence reads, we hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. That sounds great, but who does it apply to? And what are those rights? That’s what we are going to discuss in these lessons. We’re going to think about what rights do you have as an individual, and what rights might you give up to the state. We’ll talk about the history of civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. Even though we have these very powerful and very high-minded words in the Declaration of Independence…