• Who is Neil Gorsuch? U.S. Supreme Court Justice | NowThis
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    Who is Neil Gorsuch? U.S. Supreme Court Justice | NowThis

    Senator, those are not my words and I would never had said them. I didn’t say that. I asked you if you agreed with this statement. And I’m telling you I don’t. That’s Neil Gorsuch. He was appointed by President Trump to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant after the death of Antonin Scalia. Scalia died during President Obama’s term, but Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland was stonewalled by Republicans until a Conservative got into office… They have ripped us to shreds. Ripped us absolutely to shreds. Actually, I was only kidding, you can get the baby out of here. Now it’s paying off. Gorsuch will affect decades of…

  • Landmark Events Leading to the Constitution
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    Landmark Events Leading to the Constitution

    While in hindsight the American Revolutionary War and eventual Constitution seem like a sequence of neat, well planned events, in reality the Constitution was the product of many years of effort on the part of an incalculable number of individuals. Today we will study a sampling of these events and people by taking a look at a time line spanning the course of one hundred and seventy-one years. In 1620, the male pilgrims wrote and signed the Mayflower Compact. It was the first document of its kind because it was created by the people and gave them a direct say in their government – introducing the revolutionary idea that people…

  • The man who made the Constitution relevant again
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    The man who made the Constitution relevant again

    Walter Berns was at once a scholar and a patriot. And that, unfortunately, in the contemporary world, in the contemporary America, is kind of rare. Patriotism is not natural, but has to be taught or somehow acquired. And the question was then, and I suppose still is: how was this new patriotism to be taught or somehow acquired by later generations of citizens? On the one hand, he loved the country. He thought that people had to be encouraged to love it for reasons that had been stated by Walter’s great hero, Abraham Lincoln, especially in a free country. It can’t be taken for granted that people will simply love…

  • Was Friedrich Hayek an Originalist? [POLICYbrief]
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    Was Friedrich Hayek an Originalist? [POLICYbrief]

    Friedrich Hayek was an Austrian economist who lived during the 20th century. But he was not only an economist, he also developed fame as a political theorist and as a legal theorist. I believe Hayek was an originalist, although he was an originalist of a special kind. Originalism is the view that one ought to interpret the Constitution based on its original meaning. Not based on the meaning that it develops over time or that modern people would think it should have, instead based on the meaning that it had at the time of the enactment of the Constitution. Hayek thought this was extremely important because that was the only…

  • 10 Fascinating Facts About the USS Constitution
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    10 Fascinating Facts About the USS Constitution

    In 1797 an act of Congress created the United States Navy and authorized the construction of six frigates to fill the role of its capital ships. Three of the frigates were designed to be the heaviest and most powerfully armed ships of their type ever built. They were President, United States, and Constitution. A fourth, Chesapeake, was planned, but later reduced in size during construction. Named by President Washington they included innovative designs in their framing, were built of materials including southern live oak, and carried (by design) 44 guns, though in practice they each carried many more. The ships were the centerpiece of a fleet built to protect American…

  • 25. The “End” of Reconstruction: Disputed Election of 1876, and the “Compromise of 1877”
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    25. The “End” of Reconstruction: Disputed Election of 1876, and the “Compromise of 1877”

    Professor David Blight: The last book you’re reading in this course is by a great journalist, Nick Lemann. It’s called Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War. There seems to be a contest right now in writing about and publishing about the violence of Reconstruction. It’s really been discovered by American publishers and certainly by American writers. There are no less than three new books out on either the Colfax Massacre, which we’ll talk about in a minute, or what Lemann does mostly in his book, which is the story of Mississippi–sometimes called the Shotgun Policy, sometimes called the Mississippi Plan–but, in effect, a coup d’état whereby the white…

  • Chevron: Accidental Landmark
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    Chevron: Accidental Landmark

    Preserve, protect, and defend. Preserve, protect, and defend. The Constitution of the United States. The Constitution of the United States. So help you God. So help me God. May I congratulate you, sir. Chevron was decided in 1984, which was kind of midway into the Reagan administration. The Reagan administration, um, came into office with a, uh, very strong focus on deregulation of, uh, um, the economy. Reagan comes in, you got a Democratic Senate, but he wins by a pretty healthy margin. This is one of his four platforms. The incoming Reagan administration reversed some regulations that governed basically application of, uh, air pollution requirements under the Clean Air…

  • Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka | National Constitution Center | Khan Academy
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    Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka | National Constitution Center | Khan Academy

    – [Kim] Hi, this is Kim from Khan Academy, and today, we’re learning more about Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Decided in 1954, Brown v. Board was a landmark case that opened the door for desegregation and the modern civil rights movement. In Brown, the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools for white and black children, which had been prevalent throughout the American South since the 1896 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson legalized segregation, were in fact, inherently unequal. The named plaintiff in this case, Oliver Brown, was the father of Linda, a third grader who had to take a bus to a segregated elementary school that was…

  • Prairie Pulse 1209: Bruce Pitts; Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party
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    Prairie Pulse 1209: Bruce Pitts; Minnesota Farmer-Labor Party

    (electric guitar music) – Hello, and welcome to Prairie Pulse. On today’s show, Matt Olien had a chance to visit with a very special guest. – Coming up later on Prairie Pulse, we’ll take a look at the beginnings of the Minnesota Farm Labor Party. But first, our guest is Dr. Bruce Pitts. Now retired from Sanford Health. Former Chief Medical Officer there. And we’re going to talk about some other things though, that are interesting to our public TV viewers today. But first off, Dr. Pitts, just kind of tell folks a bit about yourself, your background, where you’re from originally, and what you do now. – Sure, well…

  • Constitutional amendment to support victims proposed
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    Constitutional amendment to support victims proposed

    EVERYONE IS ON BOARD. THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL CHAMBER WAS STANDING ROOM ONLY AS GOVERNOR SUNUNU LED HIS SUPPORT FOR MARSY’S LAW, A CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ESTABLISHING EQUAL RIGHTS FOR CRIME VICTIMS. >>RIGHT NOW, NEW HAMPSHIRE IS ONE OF ONLY 15 STATES WHO DOES NOT GUARANTEE RIGHTS TO VICTIMS OF CRIME UNDER OUR STATE’S CONSTITUTION WE HAVE RULES IN PLACE FOR THE ACCUSED AND THE CONVICTED BUT NOT THE VICTIMS OF CRIME. MIKE: MARSY’S LAW WAS ESTABLISHED NATIONALLY IN 2008. BY DESIGN, IT PROVIDES VICTIMS AND THEIR FAMILIES NOTIFICATIONS OF ALL LEGAL PROCESSES BEING TAKEN BY SOMEONE WHO IS ACCUSED OR CONVICTED OF HARMING THEM. SOMETHING THAT WAS NOT AFFORDED TO NEW…