• Musa I of Mali: The Real Life King Midas
    Articles,  Blog

    Musa I of Mali: The Real Life King Midas

    Picture the richest person you can possibly imagine. Is it Jeff Bezos, the super-wealthy Amazon founder? Or maybe Microsoft head Bill Gates? No matter who you chose, their wealth will still be peanuts next to the subject of today’s video. Musa I was a man so wealthy that the true extent of his riches are almost indescribable. The ruler of the Malian Empire from 1312 AD to around 1337, Musa was a man whose life was built on gold. As king he personally owned over half the Old World’s known gold reserves. On a single trip through Cairo he once spent so much that he caused the price of gold…

  • Historian Jim Penton discusses Jehovah’s Witnesses during the Nathan Knorr/Fred Franz presidencies
    Articles,  Blog

    Historian Jim Penton discusses Jehovah’s Witnesses during the Nathan Knorr/Fred Franz presidencies

    Hello, my name is Meleti Vivlon. And this is the third in our series of videos into the history of Jehovah’s Witnesses presented by Professor of History, James Penton. Now, if you’re not aware of who he is, he is the author of some well-known tomes into the history of Jehovah’s Witnesses, foremost of which is Apocalypse Delayed, the story of Jehovah’s Witnesses now in its third edition, a scholarly work, well researched and well worth the read. More recently, Jim has come up with the Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Third Reich. Jehovah’s Witnesses often use the history of the Germans, German witnesses who suffered under Hitler as a way…

  • Porfirio Diaz: Mexico’s Gentleman Dictator
    Articles,  Blog

    Porfirio Diaz: Mexico’s Gentleman Dictator

    Porfirio Diaz: Mexico’s Gentleman Dictator (Author: Morris M.) In November 1910, Mexico exploded. Triggered by a rigged election, the Mexican Revolution shook the nation. You’ve probably heard of its most-famous sons: Emiliano Zapata and Pancho Villa. You probably even know its biggest set-pieces, such as the 1914 US occupation of Veracruz. But how much do most of us know about the guy who started it all? About the guy whose rule convinced hundreds of thousands of Mexicans to take up arms and fight to overthrow him? Born in 1830, Porfirio Diaz began life as a poor nobody before rising to become his country’s absolute dictator. Starting in 1876, Diaz ruled…

  • You Weren’t There | Documentary Film | Full Length | Free YouTube Movie
    Articles,  Blog

    You Weren’t There | Documentary Film | Full Length | Free YouTube Movie

    Guitar music) – Chicago in those days wasn’t conservative, it was corrupt. A segregated, corrupt city, run by, you know, some vicious people. – It was a real tight-ass Catholic kind of shove a piece of coal up your butt you get a diamond kind of city (laughs). – It was a very closed down city. Very conservative, it was not open. – There was something about the whole Chicago rock and roll crowd that just viewed punk as like a threat. – [Man] If you walked down the street with a Mohawk, you were going to get all kinds of comments and you might get your ass kicked. –…

  • Strengthening the Second Amendment | D.C. v. Heller
    Articles,  Blog

    Strengthening the Second Amendment | D.C. v. Heller

    Mr. Beat presents Supreme Court Briefs Washington, D.C. 2002 Robert A. Levy of the libertarian think tank the Cato Institute, seeks to challenge a DC law that made it illegal to possess handguns, automatic guns, or high capacity semi-automatic guns. In fact, the law, which had been effect since 1976, said DC residents couldn’t even keep them in their own homes. Levy tries to find DC residents to sue the city, based on his argument that the gun ban went against the Second Amendment of the Constitution. Levy would fund the whole thing. He found six residents with various backgrounds who agreed to sue, among them Shelly Parker, a software…

  • You Weren’t There | Documentary Film | Free YouTube Movie | Full Length
    Articles,  Blog

    You Weren’t There | Documentary Film | Free YouTube Movie | Full Length

    Guitar music) – Chicago in those days wasn’t conservative, it was corrupt. A segregated, corrupt city, run by, you know, some vicious people. – It was a real tight-ass Catholic kind of shove a piece of coal up your butt you get a diamond kind of city (laughs). – It was a very closed down city. Very conservative, it was not open. – There was something about the whole Chicago rock and roll crowd that just viewed punk as like a threat. – [Man] If you walked down the street with a Mohawk, you were going to get all kinds of comments and you might get your ass kicked. –…

  • Confederate Leaders – The American Civil War
    Articles,  Blog

    Confederate Leaders – The American Civil War

    This, Jefferson Davis (1808-1889) was the president of the Confederate States of America. After the Confederacy lost the Civil War, Jefferson Davis was imprisoned for two years. He was indicted on charges of treason, but never tried. This is Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis’ wife and the First Lady of the Confederacy. Alexander Stephens (1812-1883, photo was taken in 1866) was the Vice President of the Confederate States of America. Confederate General Robert E. Lee (1807-1870, painting from 1865) commanded the powerful and successful Army of Northern Virginia. In 1865, he was given command of all southern armies. General Lee. Aas a brilliant tactician, revered by many. His surrender at Appomattox,…

  • Gonzales v. Carhart Summary | quimbee.com
    Articles,  Blog

    Gonzales v. Carhart Summary | quimbee.com

    – [Instructor] A safe effective form of reproductive healthcare or an inhumane, life-ending procedure? This was the debate over a controversial abortion procedure in Gonzalez v. Carhart. Although the vast majority of abortions occur in the first trimester, the most common method of abortion in the second trimester was called dilation and evacuation. In Stenberg v. Carhart, the United States Supreme Court held that a Nebraska law outlawing dilation and evacuation was unconstitutional. In response, Congress passed the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003. The act prohibited intact dilation and evacuation, a variation of the standard procedure by which the fetus’s body was kept mostly intact until the abortion was…

  • Gettysburg: America’s Deadliest Battle
    Articles,  Blog

    Gettysburg: America’s Deadliest Battle

    It’s the bloodiest battle ever fought on American soil. From July 1 to July 3, 1863, the Battle of Gettysburg raged in an anonymous corner of Pennsylvania. Pitching the Confederate forces of Robert E. Lee against the Union Army of the Potomac, it saw some 160,000 troops clash in a history-changing dust-up. Over the course of three days, 7,058 soldiers were killed, with another 44,000 wounded or captured. Outside of WWII’s worst battles, no other single event has definitively taken so many American lives. Pearl Harbor, 9/11, the Tet Offensive… all of these are mere drops in an ocean of blood compared to Gettysburg. Yet the story of Gettysburg is…