Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill – Second Reading – Part 7
Articles,  Blog

Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill – Second Reading – Part 7


patricia at least be listening to new zealand business she should at least be listening to small and medium-sized enterprises so being driven out of business by the stupid policy so I’m sorry mr. speaker 2am to put the strongly but we do feel strongly about this we feel strongly that new zealand business should have a fear opportunity to grow their businesses in New Zealand that we shouldn’t be penalizing a local businesses who are being created by foreign companies we should offer them the kind of protection under anti-dumping law which is our right Thank You mr. speaker with that authority oppose this bill I call feature territory Thank You mr. speaker I’d like to start my contribution by giving a sincere congratulations to the new minister and wish you the best in who robbed our food like to and work towards a friendly relationship by and sincerely thinking the likes of Mr Hudson another backbench national employees who have contributed to this evening the short spend contributions has given me ample time to make a full contribution this evening of which i am truly truly grateful to the minister spoke about the Select Committee being a broke ass process over the period and it was a robust process because it was split 50-50 in terms of those representing the people of New Zealand on that committee so it was very robust but it was only the those and the opposition parties who were actually doing the job in listening to not only actually industry submitters but the officials who gave information to the government it seems in having this bill brought forward this evening that the government has decided to not infect do the same the new minister seems to have ignored that advice of her own officials and it does not seem to be a poor teacher start to her new role The ministers description of the change in what he describes as a lettuce a contribution to the latest work of the discretionary who discriminate powers will achieve absolutely nothing it will have business and already if this bill passes let’s be very very straightforward about what that will do it is clear to that business will immediately immediately have to manage new risk in making business decisions because that is what this bill does and i hope to have the time to go into detail of held as being achieved unfortunately through this legislation i would like to actually just highlight the contribution of the year of the commons committee she in her contribution seem to imply that by making these changes we were complying with WTO requirements so we already comply with WTO requirements and further to that L compliance is very very discretionary in terms of our anti-dumping commitments under the WTO system so what the chia seed didn’t sing didn’t sing to ring true for me mr. Chairman I would like to address mr. Hudson’s contribution but truly I can’t be bothered so this bill was drafted in response to the cost of building materials and new zealand with particular significance to the Canterbury earthquakes a pragmatic parliamentary response to the Canterbury earthquakes at a time permitted dump good soup now what that statement means is at the time the government reacted with the assistance of parliament to actually enable the importation of goods it what we would normally define is a dumped process to it happened it’s happened already Parliament had the power to act and it did so but that does not mean that this argument now is a sound one it so well-rounded and comprehensive and comprehensive system of countervailing duties helps to ensure that there is a level playing field for new zealand businesses and so is it and it is important that we look at this countervailing system but we did that we we got past the first reading and then we could from the experience to and if it was then that this whole process should have ended it should have ended abruptly and the minister should have gone away and start again we’re foreign producers to benefit from subsidies or without dump products it below domestic prices here in New Zealand harming our local businesses and industries you can fish will always oppose this I stand here now in what appears to be a combined stand by this side of the house to stay in against what appears to be blatant stupidity to be quite honest right so the course of feedback from industry expert advisors to the Select Committee into mp’s directly has been unanimous as far as i can tell you know i used this one quote for illustration the neat effect will enable dumping with no real recourse for local manufacturers to away from the back room government officials and out in the real world there are no there is no debate this bill will weaken protection for new zealand producers yeah he has been no debate is only being a vessel argument from this side of the house the most imaging issue was the introduction of the consumer interest cause it has told me to remind ourselves what it is we’re talking about here and we are talking about meters to stop what we call dumping which is weird foreign producers can bring good into New Zealand at lower prices not because they’re more efficient not because they’re more expert not because they have larger scales of production necessarily but because they’ve had assistance from their own government subsidies so that’s what we’re trying to stop we’re not trying to stifle competition from around the world although it seems that there is becoming a harder and harder argument to have but with saying don’t bring in these Goods because you guys over there have not played by the rules so is business new zealand see in fact we depend significantly on international trade and we follow WTO rules in all countries we export to this bill would make new zealand made products vulnerable to one fear predatory pricing by international computers there is the simple fact of it to this bill will affect the innovation of small-business the small key business they’re already has to compete around the world and all they really have is the keyword Smart the entrepreneurship and a reduction of costs but now what this government will do with this legislation is add another barrier in terms of uncertainty in risk those businesses will suffer and Julie especially in most of clearly those businesses and our manufacturing and export oriented sector let’s be very clear in the hairs tonight the government officials have acknowledged that the t-step will be applied to them and consumer interest will be intrinsically subjective and i quote that this subjectivity will impose a cost on business is investment decisions will have defector an additional level of uncertainty into the risk in return calculations mr. speaker easy one first along with colleagues across the side of the house are absolutely opposed to the implementation of this and this process suit so New Zealand companies are disadvantaged by the insurgency as soon as this bill passes and I said that before literally as soon as this bill passes through all parts in this house and becomes law that will create a level and of uncertainty we have observed as others have noted to the australian government has refused twice already to make similar changes to the introduction legislation and for the simple very same reasons we outline here tonight the Aussies not the sharpest tools in the the hoop in the year just rejected it twice and in so doing what this what their what their national party needs to be cognizant of is that what they’re doing I was opening up a window for the Australian economy because in passing this legislation and in trying to counter the uncertainty new zealand businesses will almost invariably move to boise because they know what the rules are they know what the outcomes will be and I know how they can be particularly business from NT dumped from dumping practices here there is the reality of this situation submitters were overwhelmingly opposed to this bill warning that it would likely it would be likely to tilt the playing field in favor of damp to subsidize imports rather than supporting local producers and jobs the new zealand government won’t support domestic producers but New Zealand first will thank you Mr Speaker I call Simon O’Connor how does one follow a speech like they’re indeed we’ll give it a creek Mr Speaker very pleased to take a call on the second reading of the trade anti-dumping and countervailing duties amendment bill like other members on both sides of the house want to acknowledge the new minister the Honorable Jackie Dean had the pleasure of working with here in a number of fields but most recently on the Health Committee it gives me great confidence that she takes over this role and bring yourself up to speed as she is clearly doing in this area and others at the commons committee is looking through look a number of members have touched on an array of things which I don’t intend to overly repeat i think someone used only the word robust that’s certainly how the committee has approached this is being free and frank discussion I think both sides both government and opposition have drawn their lines fairly clearly on the side we see this as a positive step that the existing legislation does not allow a public interest test to exist an opportunity if you will for well it’s that old adage the law is made for the main and not the other way around so this is an opportunity for the minister man or woman to be able to look with good advice to the likes of mb officials to go are they actually benefits to the consumer which outweigh the benefit if you will of continuing duty and one anything to construct

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *