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Why Does Free Speech Matter?


Freedom of speech on college campuses is absolutely
critical. It’s critical to the growth of individuals
on these campuses, but also to ideas in society. We are a mutually respectful republic, in
which, uh, difference of opinion is valued and not, uh, not condemned. Free speech is um, you know, the center of
a civilized society. You can’t develop as a society without different
ideas. And college is where this starts. Viewpoint is something that is
often left out of the conversation. Instead of engaging in thoughtful dialogue
and trying to persuade people, a lot of people think twice about inviting people with some
controversial ideas to speak. It’s a very dangerous precedent to allow anger
to turn into intimidation. But it doesn’t take very many in order to,
uh, uh, set a certain tone. Look at what happened at, at Berkeley; fires and
rioting. It makes it very difficult for those who disagree
to speak out. But that’s not the way … I know that’s not
the way a university should work. Universities should be a place that are all
about the free exchange of ideas and people openly discussing and challenging each other. There’s no higher compliment you can pay somebody
else’s idea than thinking it’s important enough to be worth disagreeing with. I don’t think there should be harassment or
any sort of forms of, you know, accepted hate speech on college campuses. That’s how society has always progressed. With different debate and discussion and different
ideas. You need to be able to engage with people
who have opposite opinions of you and understand where they’re coming from. Change the dialogue that’s going on and mix
it up so that it isn’t just one thing being said over and over in an echo chamber. Having those different viewpoints not only
helps individuals grow, expand their ideas, and view things from different points, but
also helps people bring up different, um, ideas to approach solving problems. The Federalist Society promotes and preserves
freedom of discussion and debate on college campuses and law school campuses across the
United States. It pushes you to think about every perspective. That’s missing at a majority of law schools
and I think that’s something that the Federalist Society does well on law school campuses.

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